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Today's News

  • Library announces upcoming October classes

    The Anderson County Library will offer the following free classes in October. All classes are subject to cancellation, and class space is limited to five students. Students will use the library’s laptops. Call the library at 839-6420 to make reservations or contact Tami Elam at the library.

    Intro to Computers  
    When: Oct. 1
    Time: 10 a.m.

    Intro to Computers  
    When: Oct. 3
    Time: 3 p.m.

    Movie Night:
    The Woman in Black  
    When: Oct. 3
    Time: 5:30 p.m.

  • High school freshmen give back

    The freshman class at the Anderson County High School completed several community service projects around Anderson County last Thursday morning while sophomores and seniors were completing standardized tests.

  • American Legion Auxiliary raises more than $6,000 in Poker Run

    The American Legion Auxiliary’s sixth Healing Field Poker Run was held Sept. 14 and raised more than $6,000 with 82 motorcyclists registered, according to a press release.
    Past Department President Jane McKnight had chosen the Healing Field as her special project for her year as president. McKnight presented a check to Department Secretary Jennifer Mullins at the Healing Field just before the ride began with the riders around for the presentation. Pictures were taken at the Healing Field and then the Department Secretary signaled the start of the ride.

  • ‘Duck Dynasty’ stars to appear in Lexington

    For the Frankfort Christian Academy, it’s being called a “miracle.”
    For folks smitten with Uncle Si, Phil, Willie and the rest of the Robertson clan from the smash hit TV show “Duck Dynasty,” getting a chance to see several of the show’s stars Saturday in Lexington may not be a miracle, but it’s pretty darn close.

  • Lion’s Club plans annual 5K Run/Walk for Sight Saturday

    The Lawrenceburg Lion’s Club will host a “5K Run/Walk for Sight” on Saturday morning, Sept. 28 during the Burgoo Festival to raise money to buy eye glasses for the under-priviledged people in Anderson County.
    Organizers said they hope the community will come out and participate.  
    The event will begin at the Lion’s Club Pavilion in Anderson County Park. The course will proceed out of the park and right onto Mustang Lane. The traffic will be stopped at Highway 44 so everyone can proceed down Saffell Street.

  • Public library takes next step in expansion process

    For library board trustees, planning for the future of the Anderson Public Library includes spending up to $15,000 to conduct a feasibility study.
    The library board voted unanimously to select Lexington architecture firm Brandstetter Carroll Inc. to start work on a feasibility study, with trustees signing off on spending up to $15,000 on the study.

  • Former chamber chair succumbs to cancer

    A local businesswoman and former chairwoman of the Anderson County Chamber of Commerce died Monday following a lengthy battle with cancer.
    Cindy Peterson, 41, died at her home, surrounded by family members, according to information provided in her obituary. (See below).
    She owned and operated Liberty Tax and Cash A Check on US 127 Bypass, along with her mother, Joan Markwell, and husband, Brent, and chaired the chamber’s board of directors in 2011.

  • Poker run raises $5,000 for Bobby Best

    Bobby Best is one of those people you can’t keep indoors, his son Robbie Best said Saturday.
    Robbie, waiting for kickstands to go up at Cummins Irish Pub during the Bobby Best Poker Run fundraiser last Saturday morning, said his dad had another surgery last Friday night, but was recovering well enough to be moved out of the ICU into a progressive care unit.
     “Like usual, kicking and fighting, trying to get out of there,” Robbie said.

  • Five things your children may not recognize from 1973

    Because I work for an Anderson County institution that has been in operation since the late 1800s, I feel it’s my duty to appreciate the reporters, designers and proofreaders who came before me by taking a trip into The Anderson News archives.  
    I recently got my hands on a bound archive of the paper from 1973, and I realized something.
    Well, two things.

  • Trying to explain the unexplainable

    Good people die nearly every day in Anderson County.
    From age to disease to accidents, people beloved by their friends and families are taken too soon no matter their age, leaving mourners in their wake and questions about why God takes them from our lives.
    Most, through no fault of their own, go largely unnoticed outside of their immediate circle of loved ones. Others, for whatever reason, leave a deeper impression on those around them — not for any tangible reason, just because they do.