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Today's News

  • Since we eat them, we might as well grow them

    Spring has sprung and all I can think is “Ah, warmth.”
    It’s a psychological high unmatched by anything after the winter we had this year. I say psychological because 60 degrees outside is different than 60 degrees inside. One calls for shorts and flip-flops, the other a sweater and slippers.
    Go figure.

  • Still hopeful that Medicaid shortfall will be solved

    Less than a week after the 2011 Regular Session concluded, my colleagues and I once again found ourselves at the state capitol to address the inevitable—a compounded Medicaid budgetary shortfall.
    With the projected shortfall for the upcoming fiscal year at an estimated $166.6 million, the governor exercised his ability to call the legislature back to Frankfort for an extraordinary session.
    The authority to call and to set the agenda for an extraordinary session lies solely with the governor, and he placed only two topics on the session call.

  • The end to three very interesting journeys

    There are certain people that you just remember.
    Some you remember because they are characters.
    But then you have some people you remember just because you do.
    There are three women that have recently come to the end of their journey and left a void in a lot of lives for that very reason, at least to me.
    First is Mary Elizabeth Cammack Perry. I never knew her real name until I read her obituary. Everybody called her Lizzie. She was 100 years old.

  • One detests bullies, the other yellow signs

    We all knew them in school, the children who for whatever reason were constantly the butt-end of jokes, taunts and in some cases physical abuse.
    They were either too heavy or thin or had too many pimples.
    They wore entirely the wrong clothes, had entirely the wrong kind of footwear and hung out with entirely the wrong crowd — if they hung out with anyone at all.
    Their grades were either too high or low, making them book nerds or “retards.” They were too short or tall, and if the latter, chastised for being too clumsy to play sports.

  • ‘Super moon’
  • We have liftoff
  • Broadband deal still in the works

    The South Anderson Water Authority inched closer to a final agreement with a broadband internet provider during its meeting last week.
    The water authority and Shelby Broadband are still ironing out details of a plan that will let the company install antennas on its water towers, which are located across Anderson County outside of Lawrenceburg.
    Shawn Cook, operations manager for the water district, said the authority made some revisions to the contract during its meeting last week and planned to send it to Shelby Broadband.

  • Sheriff’s office investigating boy’s death

    Unanswered questions are swirling around the death of a 15-year-old after he was found unconscious March 12 on Hickory Grove Road.
    The Anderson County Sheriff’s Office revealed March 19 that an investigation is ongoing, but few details were revealed in the news release, including the boy’s name.
    He is not an Anderson County student, sources said.
    The boy was pronounced dead by the Franklin County Coroner’s office March 12 at Frankfort Regional Medical Center.

  • On the right track

    Even though track usually plays second fiddle to other sports, Anderson County might be able to get some top billing in time for the state meet.

    “Track is the only sport I know of that is a supplement to every other sport,” says Anderson coach Robert Meacham, himself a former football player at Campbellsville University. “You can run track and it can help you in football. You can do things in track that will help you in soccer. You can do things in track that will help you in basketball. Volleyball players can become better jumpers in track.

  • Remembering America’s sweetheart

    She was America’s sweetheart long before Meg Ryan or Jennifer Anniston ever graced a TV set or big screen.
    And she spent her formative years right here in Anderson County.
    “She” was Lydia Hodson Copeland, a local girl who found national fame after being named America’s Junior Miss 40 years ago.
    This year also marks the 20th anniversary of her death following a lengthy battle with Hodgkin’s disease at the too-young age of 37.