.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Beekeeping school at Kentucky State scheduled for March 9

    Kentucky State University will host the 2013 Bluegrass Beekeeping School on March 9 in Frankfort, according to a news release.
    The school will include talks on many aspects of hive management, conducting beekeeping businesses, and classes about how to produce additional products from the hive such as candle making, making lotions and hand bars, and pollen collection and processing.
    Registration will begin at 8 a.m. in the lobby of Bradford Hall at Kentucky State University. Pre-registration is suggested and is available at www.ksbabeekeeping.org.

  • Survey data to gauge substance abuse in Anderson County

    To address substance abuse in Anderson County, one board says it needs data and the community’s help.  
    A substance abuse prevention board is asking for volunteers to fill out a substance abuse survey — either online or in hard-copy form — in order to address substance abuse in the county.
    The Kentucky Agency for Substance Abuse Policy or ASAP operates out of the Office for Drug Control Policy and is funded through the state legislature, according to a release from Bluegrass Prevention Center.

  • Deputy injured in head-on wreck

    An Anderson County sheriff’s deputy was injured Sunday morning when his vehicle was struck head on as he was responding to a call on Highway 44, about five miles from Lawrenceburg.
    Deputy Tony Likens suffered a broken wrist in the wreck, which was likely caused by icy road conditions at that time.
    Sheriff Troy Young said Likens was on Highway 44 when a vehicle driven by a woman went out of control and slammed into Likens’ vehicle.

  • BCB & Company performances set

    Members of the singing group BCB & Company recently performed at the state capitol, and have been invited to perform at the opening of a General Assembly session March 6, according to director Deb Arnold.
    They are also scheduled to perform at the Anderson County Chamber of Commerce Business Expo on March 23 at 11:30 a.m.
    Under the direction of Arnold and Jana Terrell, the group includes teenagers from Anderson, Boyle and Franklin counties, according to a press release.

  • School district to pay $183K to cover insurance shortfall

    The Anderson County school district is expected to foot a $183,479 bill to cover a portion of a debt-ridden insurance trust’s $60 million deficit.
    It’s been at least 10 years since the district last worked with Kentucky School Boards Insurance Trust or KSBIT to provide accident insurance and compensation for sick and injured employees, among other services.
    But Anderson County, along with about 174 school districts as well as public and private Kentucky universities, are now finding they need to pay back fees to cover KSBIT’s losses.

  • Spring moving in on us very quickly

    Coming home from work and still having daylight is such a treat. The new norm is taking the dogs for a walk right after I get home.
    It sure works the kinks out and we all love it.
    We’ve been rambling all over the farm, looking for signs of wildlife and keeping an eye on everything showing new life.
    Inside the orchard fence, the hardy kiwi look like they are ready to form up buds. My cherry tree is budding and so is a peach and pear.
    The phlox is greening up and my roses are putting on new growth.

  • 30 seconds to understanding

    Harlem Shake.
    Reading these two words may have just produced the following thoughts:
    What in the world is the Harlem Shake?
    Is that a new beverage?
    Wow, you’re writing about the Harlem Shake videos? That was like, so Feb. 2.
    Yes, I am writing about the Harlem Shake meme.
    Not because I want to appear cool (which I am certainly not), or in step with contemporary youth culture (which I am certainly not).

  • We’re not weird, we’re wonderful

    Stoned on laughing gas and thick-tongued from Novocain, I said “Lawren-th-burg” when the dentist asked where I’m from.
     “Oh, I have friends from Lawrenceburg,” she said, the cruel whirl of the drill screaming in my ears as she leaned in to fix a troublesome tooth. “They’re always sending me that goofy newspaper with all the weird stuff in it.”

  • Create safety plans for severe weather

    March 2 was the first anniversary of the devastating tornadoes that struck Kentucky last year. Governor Steve Beshear has declared March to be Severe Weather Awareness Month. If you are prepared ahead of time for severe weather, then you won’t be as stressed when the tornado sirens sound.

  • Detection is key to colorectal cancer

    March is Colorectal Awareness Month, providing an opportunity nationwide to promote awareness of colorectal cancer prevention by early detection.
    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It is treatable and preventable, although colorectal cancer is a common and lethal disease. In the United States, there are approximately 150,000 new cases diagnosed a year.