.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Two men busted for LSD, cocaine possession

    Two men pleaded not guilty last Thursday to cocaine possession and LSD trafficking charges during a District Court arraignment.  
    Benjamin Gardner, 21, 2976 Hume Bedford Road, Lawrenceburg, and Kevin Cross, 36, 1105 Jessamine Station Pike, Nicholasville, were arrested Sept. 9 around 5 p.m. after city police found cocaine, LSD and marijuana in Cross’s vehicle during a traffic stop on North Main Street.

  • Congrats, Phyllis, for winning a $50 gas card!
  • City council finalizes tax rate hike

    The city council unanimously approved the second reading of its 3.26 percent tax increase on Sept. 9.
    Council members voted 5-0 to set the real property tax rate at $1.90 per $1,000 assessed value and the personal property tax rate at $3.07 per $1,000 assessed value.
    Councilman Larry Giles was absent during last Monday night’s meeting.
    The new compensating rates will add $6 per $100,000 assessed real property and $22.20 per $100,000 assessed personal property for the upcoming fiscal year.

  • Enjoying the fading days of summer

    This Sunday marks the beginning and the end. The autumnal equinox arrives to say goodbye to summer. It has been a remarkable summer. Across the country it was the wettest since 2004.
    Those of us who lost garden plants to flooding need to come up with some solutions. I vote for raised beds.
    Cement blocks, rocks and old barn wood make great raised beds. If you know someone with a sawmill, those outside bark boards are really good, especially if they are cedar trees. The cedar helps repel insects. Mine lasted over 10 years.

  • Tired? Learn more about sleep Oct. 17

    Do you remember when you had a good night’s sleep?
    Dr. Demetra Antimisiaris, PharmD, CGP, FASCP, from the University of Louisville Dept. of Neurology, will talk about sleep health on Oct. 17 in Anderson County.
    Here are some tips on getting a good night’s sleep. She will provide extensive information on sleep health which will help you or other family members from young children to seniors.

  • One ring, two mothers

    She’s found strange things on the school bus.
    Usually it’s costume jewelry, band instruments and orphaned cleats forgotten under seats until Rita Edington walks down to clean the aisles.
    Bus 27 is her bus, the only bus she ever drove for 25 1/2 years.
    But once, she found a ring.
    A mother’s ring.
    And Rita has wondered about this mother for more than a decade.
    Rita never removes the gold band on her pinkie finger.

  • Daughter, son-in-law earned each other

    “Shallow men believe in luck or in circumstance. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”
    —Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Since giving my youngest daughter’s hand in marriage last Friday afternoon, I’ve thought a lot about the idea of being lucky.
    I’ve never been one to believe in luck, and often bristle when I hear that so and so is “lucky” because he has a good job or a nice home or whatever.

  • Lawrenceburg man killed in Shelbyville wreck

    Landmark Media Services
    For the second time in less than a week, a traffic accident on Sept. 12 has claimed a life in Shelby County, this time, 57-year-old James Walker of Lawrenceburg.
    A second man, Jonathan Denning, 28, of New Albany, Ind., was taken to the University of Louisville with unknown injures.
    The accident happened at about 11 a.m. in the 7400 block of Frankfort Road, as Denning, who was driving east in a Freightliner dump truck, lost control of the vehicle when he lost tire tread, KSP spokesperson Kendra Wilson said.

  • Dozens of turtles, fish killed in county park

    Fish and Wildlife officer David Goodlett and Jason Chesser with Parks and Recreation maintenance, with the assistance of Officer Brian Wooldridge, tossed back the fish they found wriggling among the dead last Thursday.  
    They were able to save one small turtle that quickly ducked beneath lake weeds and disappeared from sight.
    Goodlett initially estimated last Thursday that there were about 500 total dead fish and turtles caught in the three commercial fishing nets placed in the middle of the Anderson County community park lake.  

  • Minority student information improperly accessed

    Anderson County school officials have admitted that an administrator improperly accessed personal information on 70 to 80 minority students, angering at least one mother and prompting changes to the district’s policies over who can access student information.
    Karen Harris said her daughter’s personal information was improperly accessed through the district’s internal student information system Infinite Campus because a graduate student needed a list of African American and bi-racial students to interview to complete his master’s degree.