Today's News

  • Gardening bug ready to bite

    March might be cold, wet and snowy, but I still believe we have come out ahead this winter.
    I joked to someone the other day that this is the kind of winters I expected to have when I moved here 16 years ago.
    This is the time of year when I really hit the pantry. I tend to scrimp on using up my home canned stuff in fall and winter, fearing I’ll run out before the fresh stuff is harvested. Now, I can eat all I want of the stuff.

  • Senate bill good start, but more is needed

    Column as I see ’em …
    It’s good to see I’m not alone in yammering for taxing districts to be made more accountable.
    The state senate agrees, at least when it comes to libraries.
    During the recent session, the senate passed a bill that would give judge-executives and their fiscal courts the power to appoint those they consider best suited to serve as library trustees.

  • Celebrating Black History month
  • Pesticide applicator training set

    The Anderson County Extension Service has scheduled private applicator pesticide training sessions on March 8 at 1:30 p.m., and on April 10 at 6:30 p.m.
    All sessions will be held at the Extension Office at 1026 County Park Road.
    According to the Extension’s release, “By law anyone using chemicals classified as ‘restricted use’ must have a valid private applicator certification card. The only way to keep this card current is to attend pesticide update training on proper use and handling.”

  • Dairy Cheer owner wanted by police

    The owner of the now-closed Dairy Cheer restaurant who allegedly stiffed employees out of thousands of dollars in pay just before Christmas is facing numerous felony and misdemeanor charges.
    Lou Compton, who operated the store for just a couple of months before skipping town, is wanted on 14 arrest warrants, including five Class D felonies for theft by deception over $500, and nine Class A misdemeanors for theft by deception under $500, according to information obtained from the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office.

  • Supreme Court sides with King

    It took only three hours last week for the Kentucky Supreme Court to confirm what state Rep. Kim King has been saying all along — that a redistricting map signed into law by the governor earlier this year was unconstitutional.
    That ruling means King, who represents the 55th District comprised of Anderson, Mercer and a portion of Spencer County, will be able to seek re-election here this fall.

  • Pancake breakfast is Saturday

    The Rotary Club of Lawrenceburg will host its annual pancake breakfast Saturday from 7 a.m. to noon at Saffell Street Elementary School, the club announced.
    The breakfast, now in its 55th year, is one of the club’s biggest annual fundraisers, with proceeds used to support the its annual scholarship fund.
    Cost is $7, and children under 5 are free.
    Tickets are available through Rotarians or at the door.

  • Blaze destroys Versailles Road home
  • PG rating needed for Family Court?

    By Lisa King
    Landmark News Service
    A cuss word uttered in court Feb. 15 by Family Court Judge John David Myles has prompted a Bowling Green attorney to file a complaint.
    Myles, who represents Anderson, Shelby and Spencer counties in the 53rd Judicial District, told attorney Travis Lock that he didn’t “give a rat’s ass” when Lock addressed Myles during a divorce hearing.
    Lock said that Myles’ behavior was unacceptable to him.

  • Soldier, farmer, lawyer

    By Meaghan Downs
    Staff writer
    The late Walter Patrick could speak with the richest man and the poorest farmer, and still have respect for both.
    Many have described the renowned local attorney, who died last Wednesday at the age of 85, as a true statesman: a humble man devoted to the law, his commonwealth and the county he called home for 60 years.  
    Community members, friends and family filled the First Christian Church sanctuary on Feb. 25 to remember the life of someone who didn’t want pomp and circumstance.