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Today's News

  • Anderson County Grand Jury indicts four on variety of charges

    The following people were indicted May 3 by the Anderson County Grand Jury.
    Randi K. Rogers, 23, of Frankfort, was indicted on 31 charges: 24 counts of second-degree criminal possession of a forged instrument; one count of theft by deception (less than $10,000); and six counts of theft by deception (less than $500).

  • District Court Docket, 6-1-2011

    Judge Linda Armstrong heard the following cases during Anderson District Court proceedings March 21.
    Michael S. Clare, disposition, failure to register transfer of motor vehicle -- continued to March 24.
    Brian C. Shearer, arraignment, first-degree possession of a controlled substance (drug unspecified), possession of marijuana, two counts of buying/possessing drug paraphernalia, residents not to use licenses of other states -- pleaded not guilty, pretrial conference March 24.

  • Lawrenceburg’s Gillis named among ‘Who’s Who’

    University of the Cumberlands inducted Taylor Gillis of Lawrenceburg into the Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges and the Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society during the 52nd Honors Day Convocation on April 25.
    Gillis was also honored with the Honors award, given to students who maintain a 3.70 GPA.

  • Turner’s top citizens
  • Fort Harrod beef festival is Saturday in Harrodsburg

    Beef will be on everyone’s minds and tongues June 3-4 during the Fort Harrod Beef Festival at the Mercer County Fairgrounds in Harrodsburg.
    On Friday, the festival will feature live entertainment, vending booths, set up of the grill-off teams and a wine and cheese tasting.
    On Saturday, the event’s main attraction kicks off with teams competing to produce the best brisket, steak, ribs and backyard burger.
    There will also be a youth backyard burger and steak category for those ages 9-17.

  • Help Anderson Humane Society get a new vehicle

    Anderson Humane Society is proud to announce we’ve been selected as a finalist in Toyota’s 100 Cars for Good program. Now we need your support.
    Vote for Anderson Humane Society at www.facebook.com/toyota on June 4.

  • Manure tea just the thing for soggy soil

    May is over and June has arrived. Let’s just be thankful for every sunrise we see.
    Tornado season is upon us. One of them hit the family farm in Huntingburg, Ind., last week. Though no one was injured, there is not a building that didn’t get damaged. Insurance will cover the costs but what a rough road ahead. We’ve been lucky here, so far.

  • Kentucky’s history wrapped in West Virginia lore

    The late Tom Clark, historian at the University of Kentucky, said something once that has always stuck with me: “Virginia is the mother of Kentucky and Kentucky is the mother of the West.”
    So true, we are the sum of all the history of Virginia, and to ignore it is to ignore the history of Kentucky.
    As I completed the article on long hunters, I remembered one of the probably most entertaining stories of Virginia, as not all explorers wore buckskin and linsey-woolsey, some wore satin and velvet.

  • These people died so you can do something else on Memorial Day

    I intended to give a mild tongue-lashing this week to those too busy shoving hot dogs and beer into the faces to attend Sunday’s Memorial Day service at the Healing Field.
    Instead, I’ve decided to save the outraged editor act for another week, and provide the names of the Kentucky soldiers killed in the war on terror who are commemorated at the Healing Field (13 more were added Sunday), along with the names of local veterans killed in wars dating back to World War I.

  • No penance for $400K mistake

    It’s a downright shame that those on the Anderson County Board of Health who voted to approve the new health department building near Walmart can’t be held personally responsible for squandering $400,000 in taxpayer money.
    Of course unlike the taxpayers who have no choice but to pay for their mistakes, they’re immune from such accountability.