Today's News

  • Turner December Citizens of the Month
  • Turner October Citizens of the Month
  • Farmers wins ‘Spirit of Giving’ award

    The downtown branch of Farmers Bank and Capital Trust won the 2011 Mayor’s Food Drive “Spirit of Giving” award for collecting the most pounds of food for Open Hands pantry.
    The bank, the 2010 winner of the “Spirit of Giving” award, collected 850 pounds at its downtown location and 250 pounds at its branch on US 127 for a total 1,100 pounds.
    Commonwealth Credit Union came in second place with 790 pounds of food.
    Other banks participating in the drive included MainSource, Century Bank, Town and Country and Wood Forest.

  • Historic district commission to discuss hearing

    The historic district commission will meet Jan. 17 at 10 a.m. at city hall to review the discussion and comments made at the Dec. 6 public hearing.
    The meeting is open to the public.

  • Frankfort Regional to build bigger, better ER

    Anderson County patients at Frankfort Regional Medical Center will experience some changes to the center’s emergency department, courtesy of a three-phase $8.4 million expansion and renovation project.
    Frankfort Regional Medical Center held a groundbreaking ceremony for the project Jan. 3, inviting doctors, nurses and other members of the staff to don a hard hat and take a sledgehammer to a wall of the old emergency facility.
    Construction for the expansion is set to begin by next week.   

  • Incumbent Carroll files for re-election

    State Sen. Julian M. Carroll, D-Frankfort filed Monday for re-election, his office announced.
    Carroll’s office made the announcement and cited his history of public service and a record of working for public employee benefits, significant progress in roads, education, and protection for senior citizens.

  • Church honors World War II veteran for military service

    Family and friends had been keeping a secret from World War II veteran Alvin “Huston” Perry for weeks: a day dedicated entirely to the 88-year-old for his years of military service.
    “I was really surprised, was really shocked,” Perry said of walking into his home congregation of Pigeon Fork Baptist Church, filled with family and friends, on Sunday morning.
    Pigeon Fork Deacon Ralph Kerry came up with the idea to honor Perry, according to Steve Mitchell, a relative of Perry’s by marriage.

  • Lawless to compete this weekend at Distinguished Young Woman contest

    From staff reports
    Lynsey Lawless, the 2012 Distinguished Young Woman for Anderson County, will compete at the state competition this weekend in Lexington.
    A daughter of Scott and Rebecca Lawless, she plans to study dermatology at the University of Louisville.
    Lawless competed in the countywide competition in March 2011.
    The Anderson High student was Overall Scholastic Achievement Winner and captured first place in her division in the Creative and Performing Arts category on her way to earning the top honor.

  • Carmichael has big game at Border Bowl

    Anderson County quarterback Seth Carmichael had a big game in the National Guard Border Bowl, played at the University of the Cumberlands in Williamsburg on Saturday.

    Carmichael completed 8-of-9 passes for 89 yards and a touchdown as he guided the Kentucky All-Stars during the first half of their game against Tennessee. Carmichael hit Eric Walker, of Covington Holy Cross, with a 37-yard scoring strike that tied the game with 3:50 to to in the first half. Carmichael was intercepted once in the second half.

  • Remembering 1994’s bitter winter blast

    We’ve complained in recent years about the single-digit temperatures we’ve seen from time to time during the winter months here in central Kentucky. So far this season, the 10-15 degree range is about as cold as we’ve gotten, but even at that you can hear grumblings from folks about how spring can’t show up fast enough.
    I thought I’d do a quick little write-up about the January we experienced here 18 years ago, just to jog our memories and remind us that it could be worse — a lot worse.