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Today's News

  • Are you remaining silent as evil and sin run rampant?

    I saw an interview this week with a man who owns an orchard and family farm near Lansing, Michigan.

  • It’s official: Anderson County is Work Ready

    A Work Ready Community sign unveiling took place last Wednesday at the Anderson County Board of Education.

    Earlier this year, Anderson County was named one of only a few Kentucky Work Ready Communities, when it became one of only 34 other counties throughout the state to hold this certificate. Superintendent Sheila Mitchell said that the Work Ready plan will prepare students better than before as Anderson County provides opportunities for additional soft-skill course work and certificates.

  • Lawrenceburg veteran has Memorial Day to remember

    Anderson County native Tom Ritchey served in the U. S. Army from 1957 to 1959, and recently was able to get back in touch with a fellow soldier he served with at the Pentagon.

    Ritchey served with Allan O’Brien as part of the Pentagon’s motor pool, and had not seen nor heard from him since they finished their time together in 1959.

  • Report: State’s general fund receipts increase 4.8 percent

    The state’s budget director reported last Friday that May’s general fund receipts rose 4.8 percent compared to May of last year, an increase of $33.8 million.

    Total revenues for the month were $739.6 million, compared to $705.8 million during May 2016. Receipts have now grown 1.5 percent for the first 11 months of fiscal year 2017.

  • Five times the joy for local grandmother

    By now, most of Kentucky has heard of the Driskall quintuplets that were born in the beginning of May at University of Kentucky. What some might not know is that one of those quintuplets grandmothers lives right here in Anderson County.

    Ann Beasley grew up in Anderson County and graduated from Anderson County High School. She is now the grandmother to five thriving grandchildren, and can’t wait for the day she can hold each one of the five babies.

  • Free Enes Kanter, protect free speech

    When the NCAA ruled Enes Kanter ineligible to play basketball for the University of Kentucky, people tweeted #FreeEnes.

    Now that the Turkish government has issued an arrest warrant for Kanter after he criticized President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the hashtag has re-emerged.

    Kanter’s fight for free speech brings an international issue to the Bluegrass. Kanter has openly criticized the Erdogan government, and in reward it revoked his passport so he could not travel.

  • Tips on controlling flies

    Warmer weather brings more pest problems. Horn flies and face flies are key pests of Kentucky cattle. Both species breed in fresh manure piles, but they present different threats and management problems. Fortunately, you have a variety of fly control options.

  • Happy to celebrate 225th anniversary

    On June 1, the Commonwealth of Kentucky celebrated the 225th anniversary of its admittance as a state into the Union. Originally a part of Virginia known as “the Kentucky County,” it became the 15th state of this nation in 1792. So today, I want to celebrate my home state of Kentucky, a place the Native American Wyandot nation called the “land of tomorrow.” Once considered the far western frontier, Kentucky has developed into a state with diverse industries, a strong heritage, and international prominence.

  • Sweet recognition for Main Street shop owners

    Local downtown retail shop, Sweet Mash, has been invited to be apart of the Kentucky Bourbon Affair’s Higher Proof Expo this Saturday, June 10, in Louisville.

    The expo has been called a “bourbon fantasy camp,” where people from all over the nation will come to get a taste of the bourbon industry in Kentucky.

  • Wild Turkey, Four Roses to host inaugural Hometown Social

    Four Roses has teamed up with Wild Turkey to host a first time event called Hometown Social. The event will take place in downtown Lawrenceburg on Thursday, June 8 from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m., and is open to ticket holders. Tickets can be purchased for $150 to $200 a person, and will be sold until the event sales out. Even without a ticket, locals will still be able to experience some aspects of the event. Shops on Main Street will be open, and some parts of the event will be able to be enjoyed by those strolling through the downtown area.