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Today's News

  • Lady Cats pounce on, devour Spencer for first district win

    Anderson County had its first district win of the season settled quickly last Wednesday night.

    The Lady Bearcats scored three times in the first 14 minutes on their way to a 7-1 rout of visiting 30th District foe Spencer County.

  • Net Cats serve coach’s first win

    Any win is a time to be happy, but when the Anderson County High School volleyball team romped past Owen County last Tuesday night, it was a time for even bigger smiles.

    Not only did the Lady Bearcats get their first win of the season, doing so on their home court, but new coach Ryan Brown claimed his first match victory as a head coach.

    “This was the first home game and in front of the home crowd,” Brown said. “We beat a regional team and this is something to build on.”

  • Bearcats look to get better against Mercer

    The optimist says things can’t get any worse than things were last Friday at Meade County. Anderson County got little accomplished on either side of the ball and took a 48-0 whipping.

    The pessimist would point out that Meade went 2-9 a year ago and this week’s opponent, Mercer County, advanced to a regional championship game in Class 4A and has some key performers back in the fold.

  • Burgoo vendors bailing out

    One of the organizers of next month’s annual Burgoo Festival told the Lawrenceburg City Council last week that its decision to make vendors set up on Main Street instead of sidewalks is seriously hurting the event.

    “I’m pleading with you,” said organizer Larry Simpson. “I’ve worked hard for three years, and I’m losing every vendor I get in here.”

    The city council ordered vendors off the sidewalks two years ago after Main Street merchants complained that they were blocking entrances to their businesses.

  • A ‘once-in-a-lifetime event’

    Carolyn Penny had no intention of joining her fellow seniors in staring at the eclipse of the sun Monday afternoon at the Anderson Senior Center.

    “When I look up into the sky, what I want to see is the face of God,” Penny said, dismissing offers to look at the eclipse through special lenses.

    Her refusals didn’t last long, though, once the light began to fade and others oohed and aahed at seeing the moon nearly eclipse the sun.

  • ‘We will miss him terribly

    An Anderson County Sheriff’s deputy died Sunday night following a lengthy illness.

    Donnie Lee Sutherland, 70, died at his residence, according to obituary information posted at the website for Gash Memorial Chapel.

    Sutherland was a longtime deputy and previously worked as a police officer with the Lawrenceburg Police Department.

    Funeral services will be 1 p.m. Thursday at First Baptist Church, with Bro. Fred Knickerbocker and Bro. Garrett Franklin officiating. Burial will follow in Lawrenceburg Cemetery.

  • Anderson class of 1967 plans 50th reunion

    While the rest of America in 1967 was embroiled in everything from the war in Vietnam to the Summer of Love, Anderson High School seniors had other, less pressing things on their minds.

    “We had the Fairgrounds Drive-In,” said Peggy Robinson-Dixon, as she and her classmates shared memories while preparing for their upcoming 50th class reunion next month at Wild Turkey Trace golf course.

    “That was our hangout.”

  • Did your road make the grade?

    Without a word of debate or dissent, the Anderson County Fiscal Court last Tuesday unanimously approved this year’s road paving list at a cost of nearly $750,000.

    Previous versions of the fiscal court bickered endlessly over which roads were to be paved. Magistrates lobbied hard for roads in their own districts, particularly 6th District Magistrate Kenny Barnett, who oversees by far the most miles of sparsely populated county highways in Anderson County.

  • Are local monument’s days numbered?

    Like it or not, the Confederate soldier statue in front of our glorious old county courthouse is an endangered species.

    Like nearly every social construct or traditional value, monuments to those who fought on the losing end of the Civil War are and will continue to be under withering assault from those who loathe our nation’s founding, and in particular, its founders.

    No pun intended, but those radicals are like patience on a statue, and are relentless in their incremental approach to force the changes they want.

  • Kentucky Music Hall of Fame honors all kinds of music

    It’s almost impossible to measure what impact the state of Kentucky has had on the music industry but the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame and museum is a place that tells the stories of singers, instrumentalists, song writers, and others from the state who have played even a small part in the rich and diverse music heritage the state enjoys.