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Today's News

  • Fallen Marine's ring comes home

    Julie Coubert doesn’t know why her late son’s class ring found its way back home — but she’s certainly glad it did.

    Marine Cpl. Timothy Dale Lewis collapsed and died in 2007 while deployed in the Philippines. He had been stationed in Japan, but was training in the Philippines for a mission in Iraq.

    Lewis was a 2004 graduate of Anderson County High School, and he lost his class ring between graduation and his deployment in 2004.

  • Could Wednesday's soccer showdown be the biggest ever on the Anderson field?

    In a week of big games in Anderson County sports this week, it would be hard to imagine one any bigger than the Anderson girls' soccer team taking on Woodford County at 7 p.m. on Wednesday night.

    Anderson is off to a 4-3 start, maybe not what some had envisioned. The Lady Cats showed they can be vulnerable when they put up a clunker at Central Hardin, but their other losses (West Jessamine and South Oldham) can be chalked up as things that can happen when two outstanding teams meet.

  • Lady Bearcat soccer routs Owen

    Even though Anderson was heavily favored over Owen County last Tuesday, Lady Bearcat coach Jason Earnest reminded his team there was more to his pregame speech than the usual, “We have to take one game at a time” usually reserved for such occasions.

    There really was something riding on the outcome. “We still needed to play for district seeding,” Earnest said. “It got out of hand fast.”

    Anderson, obviously motivated, grabbed a 7-0 halftime lead even though Earnest put some resrictions on his team after it gained a 4-0 advantage.

  • Kickin' some grass!

    The state’s spotlight will shine on Anderson County this week as farmers from across Kentucky converge here to discuss and view forage and grassland.

    The Kentucky Forage and Grassland Council Field Day is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 3 from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Buddy Smith’s farm on 1984 Graefenburg Road.

    This will mark the first time the event has been held in central Kentucky, according to Extension agriculture agent Tommy Yankey. It will feature some of the most cutting-edge forage and grassland work being done today in agriculture, he said.

  • Beaver Lake Road to close Thursday

    The county road department is closing Beaver Lake Road at the second causeway on Thursday, Sept. 3 beginning at 8 a.m.

    The road will remain closed until 4 p.m. for culvert repair, said road foreman Chip Chambers.

  • Community calendar - 9.2 to 9.8

    Wednesday, Sept. 2

    Education

    8 a.m. to noon, GED instruction and college preparation, Anderson Community Education building, 219 E. Woodford St.

    Noon to 4 p.m., GED instruction and college preparation, Bluegrass Community and Technical College, U.S. 127 campus.

    4:30 p.m., Anderson Middle School site-based decision making council meeting.

    4:30 to 7:30 p.m., GED instruction and college preparation, Anderson Community Education building, 219 E. Woodford St.

  • COLUMN: Septic opponents should be careful what they wish for

    Screaming for government to be fair is sometimes no different than one sibling quibbling with another over who takes the first bath.

    Eventually, everyone gets a good soaking.

    Soaked is likely what everyone who owns a septic tank will eventually get, thanks to a crowd of about 50 people who voiced their displeasure during last Wednesday’s board of health meeting.

  • Letters to the editor - 8.26

    This American will not stand for socialism

    To the editor:

    I offer the following points about the ongoing debate over government-run health care:

    1. Where in our Constitution does it state that health care is a right or that the federal government is ordained to force health care upon the populace without its consent?

    2. The Canadian health care system is on the verge of bankruptcy, following our own in Massachusetts and California government run health care plans, which are billions of dollars in the red.

  • Man thought to be county's oldest resident dies at 103

    The man believed to be the oldest Anderson County citizen died Friday.

    Several sources, including the Anderson County Clerk’s office, said that to their knowledge, Charles O. Bertram, 103, was Anderson County’s oldest citizen.

    For more about Mr. Bertram, see this week's Anderson News, available on newsstands across the county.

    Subscribe online or call 502-839-6906.

  • EDITORIAL: Another commercial property bites the dust

    It’s frightening, really, that the board of health apparently never even considered the tax-base ramifications of building its new $2.1 million health department next door to Wal-Mart.

    That decision forever eliminates yet another piece of prime commercial real estate from the property tax rolls, a practice of public agencies here that is all too common and needs to stop.