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Today's News

  • Ready to ‘Deal’

    UPDATED NOV. 12, 2 P.M.

    Wanda Waldridge of Salvisa appeared on the popular game show "Deal or No Deal" both Monday and Tuesday nights.

    Waldridge originally thought the episodes in which she was scheduled to appear would run at the end of this month. But when her cell phone started ringing Monday night, she quickly found out that wasn't the case.

    "I wasn't even at home," Waldridge said, adding that her friends and family kept calling to tell her she was on TV.

  • Locals react to Obama’s win in election

    While many welcomed Barack Obama as the 44th president, his election last Tuesday is especially meaningful to black citizens.

    “I think it’s great, I really do,” said Thomas Allen. “This is great for those who came through the past tribulations.”  

    Allen grew up in Anderson County at a time when he and other local black students were bused out of county to attend high school.

  • Choosing my seat on Obama’s bus

    I voted eight times — I’ll explain that later — last Tuesday morning for McCain.

    Needless to say I was disappointed that evening when Obama claimed victory and McCain accepted defeat.

    Losing only matters, though, when you examine what went wrong and fix the errors of your ways.

    Here’s where I went wrong.

    I admit being a bit dubious at first about McCain, and was struggling to consider voting for him once, let alone eight times.

  • Dillow’s strong showing earns state berth

    Anderson County runner Austin Dillow turned in a strong showing at the Class 3A, Region 6 cross country meet, held Saturday at Masterson Station Park in Lexington. Dillow’s time of 18:20.84 over the 5-kilometer course was good enough to earn a berth in the state meet, scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 15 at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington.

    Dillow was almost two minutes behind the winner, Rob Wahl, of Paul Dunbar, but held off Lafayette’s Michael Lobbo for 16th place in the meet.

    Dunbar won the team championship as well.

  • Mixed emotions

    A bittersweet aura floated through the crowd during the American Legion Auxiliary’s Healing Field and Veterans Day Ceremony on Sunday afternoon.

    Those in attendance seemed saddened to have to raise 11 new flags at the Healing Field, but triumphant to have a place to honor the state’s fallen heroes — especially since its grounds were flattened during a storm five months ago.

  • LEBANON – Football coaches, perhaps more than any other sort, like to discuss just how much their sport mirrors life.

    The successful ones preach positive thinking over and over. Not the kind of pie-in-the-sky dreaming some mistakenly equate with the attitude, but the real-life nuts-and-bolts attitude that drives so many successful people in all occupations.

    Work hard, and good things will happen.

    A real team can accomplish much more than individuals.

    All roles, no matter how small, are important.

  • Western Hills routs Bearcats

    UPDATED Friday, Nov. 7, 11:25 p.m.

    Western Hills ruined Anderson County's Senior Night with a 32-13 romp past the uninspired Bearcats Friday night.

    “We didn't show up,” said Anderson coach Mark Peach. “I am embarrassed.”

    Western Hills repeatedly made the plays it needed to while Anderson dropped passes -- “Too many to count,” Peach said – missed tackles and stopped promising drives with penalties.

  • Never giving up

    One of the biggest perks of this job is getting to know people like J. C. Briscoe.

    It’s when you meet winners like this sophomore at Anderson County High School that you realize, again, that championships are not always the ultimate prize.

    To be sure, it is easy to get caught up in the excitement a big trophy can bring. Anderson County basketball fans sold over 5,000 tickets when the Bearcats last made the state tournament.

  • How low will it go?

    Six weeks ago locals flocked to neighborhood gas stations to fill up on $4-a-gallon gasoline before it rose to a rumored $5-a-gallon.

    That was then.

    Last week people hustled back to fill up for a much more appealing reason — to take advantage of gasoline prices that were falling at a record pace.

  • An explanation for an unhappy reader

    A very pleasant but obviously unhappy lady called me Friday to object to the number of harvested deer and other wildlife photos that appeared in last week’s paper.

    She is a long-time subscriber but made it clear that if dead animal photos continue to be printed, she most certainly will not renew her subscription again.

    To slugs like me who sell newspapers, that’s like hearing nails on a chalkboard.