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Today's News

  • Inmate held for mouthing judge

    By Ben Carlson, News staff

    A female inmate was ordered to serve 30 days for contempt of court after calling District Court Judge Donna Dutton a pair of derogatory names during a court appearance last Thursday.

    Moments after Dutton warned Melissa Reece, 30, of 244 Douglas Ave., Frankfort to be stop “running her mouth,” Reece apparently called Dutton a b**ch and a wh*re while walking away.

    After being alerted to what Reece said, Dutton ordered her back in front of the bench.

  • Fire destroys woman’s home

    By Ben Carlson, News staff

    As her neighbors poured her coffee and tried to console her, all Sherry Perry could do last Thursday evening was stand in their front yard and watch her home on Alton Road go up in flames.

    “To be honest, I was just in shock,” Perry said the following day. “I’d only been gone about five minutes — I was with my ex-husband — when my neighbor called him and said my house was on fire. He thought I was in the house.”

  • Psych eval ordered for ex-bus monitor

    By Ben Carlson, News staff

    The former bus monitor charged with pushing a child’s face into a seat and tearing up another child’s homework entered Alford pleas on two misdemeanor charges last Thursday in Anderson District Court.

  • City council mulls new tax on liquor, wine

    By Ben Carlson, News staff

    Mayor Sandy Goodlett said last Thursday that Lawrenceburg police spend two thirds of their time dealing with alcohol-related issues, and that it’s time for those who sell and drink it to pay a greater share of the associated costs.

    During a special called city council meeting, Goodlett presented a pair of ordinances related to the sale of alcohol, both of which passed on first reading.

    A second reading and formal passage on both is required.

  • Director says no tax increase needed for health department

    By Ben Carlson, News staff

    Thanks in large measure to an expected surplus in his current budget, Tim Wright, the county’s director of public health, did not recommend a tax increase during last Thursday’s meeting of the Anderson County Board of Health.

    “When I was hired, I promised the board I’d do everything I could to keep from raising the health tax,” Wright said. “Going into my fourth year, it looks like I’m going to prevent it from happening again.”

  • Library lawsuit appears headed to Supreme Court

    By Ben Carlson, News staff

    The public library here and others across the state breathed a sigh of relief last Friday when the state’s Court of Appeals overturned a lower court’s ruling that would have forced them to return their tax rates to 1960s levels.

    The decision overturned rulings by two circuit court judges who found in favor of a taxpayer group in northern Kentucky that sued based on libraries not following state statutes when raising their taxes.

  • Up, up and away!
  • Up to Supremes to make right call

    By Ben Carlson, Publisher

    It doesn’t matter which side you’re on when it comes to the disappointing decision of the Kentucky Court of Appeals regarding a lawsuit filed against our library and others in Northern Kentucky.

    The bottom line is that with its decision in favor of the libraries, the Court of Appeals is allowing an unelected and wholly unaccountable body to set tax rates and spend other people’s money.

    It’s called taxation without representation and, like the old TV cartoon said, that’s not fair.

  • April brings warmth, chores and flowers

    Well, I might as well tell you, I’m selling the farm and moving in town. I’m just getting too old to do this stuff. My get up and go has got up and went.

    The only gas I have left escapes when I cough or sneeze. I blame my father for always calling me a little fart. Oh come on folks, don’t be sad. Look at the calendar.

  • Time to think about spring weather safety

    After record snowfall and bitterly cold temperatures, most Kentuckians welcome the transition into spring. Still, changeable weather is one of the harbingers of the season, and often it comes in the form of high winds and blustery conditions. Even though tornadoes can occur in any season, they are most common in spring, along with downbursts and windstorms.