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Today's News

  • GRACE MCKEE BETA SIGMA PHI ‘FIRST LADY OF THE YEAR’

    50 YEARS AGO

    Thursday, April 21, 1966

    Garvice Gibson suffered a severe cut on his left arm April 10 while servicing a power shaft of a truck at his home. He said his shirtsleeve caught in the shaft. The wound required a large number of stitches.

    The home of Mrs. Maurice Miller, known as the Hol Martin property on Waterfill Street, sold at public auction to Carl Gene Peak for $4,050.

    Thursday, April 28, 1966

  • Revolutionary War soldier honored with service

    Some relatives didn’t make it due to the rainy weather but spirits weren’t dampended for those who attended the Patriot Grave Marking Service at Darnall Cemetery last Saturday.

    It took five years, but a marker was finally placed at the gravesite of Revolutionary soldier Adam Darnall just a few months ago by great-great-great-great grandson Wayne Darnell.

    Over time the spelling of the name has changed., but the strong feeling family and soldier to soldier remains.

  • Helping hands, green thumbs

    From staff reports

    Christian Academy of Lawrenceburg juniors and seniors spent last Wednesday morning sprucing up the landscaping in front of the Anderson Senior Center.

    “The kids from CAL are just another example of how some very simple acts of kindness can make a big difference at the senior center,” director Steve Carmichael said. “When given the opportunity and knowing there’s a need, the support we get from young people like these and others makes you value the life we have in Lawrenceburg even more.”

  • American Legion’s national commander visits Healing Field

    From staff reports

    The American Legion National Commander Dale Barnett of Georgia visited the Department of Kentucky Healing Field last Thursday.

    Unit President Pam Brough presented Barnett with a commemorative bottle of bourbon with a picture of the Healing Field etched on the bottle.

    “The American Legion has worked very hard to get MIA’s (Missing in Action) and POW’s (Prisoner of War) home,” Barnett said. “And three American soldiers’ remains have been released from North Korea.”

  • Narcan, jail costs are budget busters

    Column as I see ’em …

    As folks fret and debate over installing a needle exchange at the health department (at taxpayer expense, of course), taxpayers might also want to consider the other costs associated with what is quickly becoming a hard-drug epidemic here in Lawrenceburg.

    In March, the county’s jail bill to house inmates in Shelby County was right around $70,000.

    That’s just for one month and heady stuff compared to what the county was spending even a year ago.

  • May means it’s time to hit the garden

    Yay, it’s May, let the hardening off begin!

    All my seeds have sprouted and grown and now await the process of hardening off.

    This just amounts to me carrying trays in and out, every day, for a few hours to get used to the outside world. They go from climate controlled, to anything goes, in a matter of a week.

  • The good and bad about carpenter bees

    Male and female carpenter bees are becoming active after spending winter in last year’s tunnels. These large yellow and black bees have shiny, bare abdomens in contrast to the hairy ones of bumblebees.

  • Cann should play key role for Wildcat women

    Remember those days when you could walk up to the ticket window at Memorial Coliseum and watch the University of Kentucky women’s basketball team play from no more than a few rows off the floor?

    That might be an exaggeration but not by much. Before Matthew Mitchell came, I’d been to games against Tennessee when I could have sworn there was more orange than blue in the house where Adolph Rupp once coached.

    And I can remember running a UK media release advertising an offer to purchase season tickets to women’s basketball for 20 bucks.

  • Lady Bearcats focus on win at Dunbar

    LEXINGTON – There is little argument against the idea that, when healthy and motivated, Anderson County is a heavy favorite to win the Eighth Region softball championship. It is also a given that the Lady Bearcats could be a threat to win the whole shebang when the 16 regional survivors meet in Owensboro the second weekend of June.

  • GROWING WITH HIS ROOTS

    The roots Connor Duncan wanted to grow with were roots he’d never seen or experienced.

    They were roots literally about halfway around the world and roots with no obvious manifestations in the Anderson County High School track star.

    Until now.

    Just look at his arm. His left arm, to be exact.

    Look at all of the ink on his left shoulder. On his bicep and tricep. All the way past his elbow to his forearm.

    Connor Duncan, the blue-eyed, blonde-haired hurdler, is in touch with his Samoan roots.