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Today's News

  • Balance powers Lady Bearcats past Bullitt Central netters 3-2

    Anderson County put together an impressive showing Thursday night as the Lady Bearcats defeated visiting Bullitt Central 3-2 in girls' tennis action.

    Two of Anderson's wins came in straight sets and both losses went the distance before Bullitt Central prevailed.

    Anderson's top singles player, Mary Ellen Stratton dropped the first set 6-7 but came back to win the final two sets.

  • Health, safety fair set for Saturday

    A health and safety fair featuring free screenings and children's events is scheduled for Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Anthony D. Stratton Building, located in the county park.

    The annual fair, hosted by the Anderson County Chamber of Commerce with assistance from the Anderson County Health Department, will include a bicycle rodeo and physical activity challenge for children, along with a roll over car simulator.

  • Into the Wild Blue Yonder

    Joshua Yeaste knew what he wanted to do in life before he ever started school.

    "I have always wanted to fly since I was a little boy," Yeaste said.

    The senior at Anderson County High School moved one step closer to that dream when he accepted an appointment to the United States Air Force Academy during a ceremony Friday at the high school.

    "He was 4 years old when he first said that he wanted to fly," Yeaste's mother, Ginger, recalled. "It has just been what he wanted to do."

  • Shelby takes lead in district race

    SHELBYVILLE - It was everything a match-up of two regional contenders would be expected to be.

    Shelby County's Jordan Burk settled down after shaky start to outduel Anderson County's Ryan Pike as the Rockets took a 3-0 victory in a much-anticipated 30th District showdown last Thursday. An overflow crowd saw the region's top two teams, according to the pre-season coaches' poll, battle with every pitch, every swing and every catch counting.

  • City should consider tax's bottom line

    It sure sounds good, that whole restaurant tax idea, especially when its promoters and the city council continue to ignore or at least refuse to question the reality of the situation.

    The sales pitch presented Monday by tourism officials giddily ignored the proposal's economic feasibility, and did so with an enabling assist from council members who asked only a couple of benign questions, including if the money could be used to build a pool. (More on that in a moment.)

  • All this over a few grand?

    Reason and common sense dictate that farmers should be forced to purchase a business license, just like any other business in Anderson County.

    Trouble is, reason and common sense are often not attributes ascribed to the way government at any level treats farmers when it comes to taxes - be they property or otherwise.

    Nor should they be.

    Farmers for centuries have occupied a pedestal in America reserved for few others - only members of the armed forces come immediately to mind.

  • New system warns uninsured drivers to pay

    Anderson County residents whose motor vehicles are not insured will soon have to pay up or have their vehicle registration revoked.

    Starting at the end of this week, about 200 residents will receive notifications by mail informing them that if they don't get proper insurance coverage in 30 days, their vehicle registration will be canceled, said Anderson County Clerk Harold Ritchey.

    After the initial round of letters, notifications will be sent out to new offenders on a monthly basis, Richey said.

  • Serious flaws evident in plan to reduce schools' sports schedules

    There are times you see or hear something, shake your head in disbelief, then look again.

    And you shake your head even more.

    In case you missed it, last Thursday, the Kentucky Association of School Superintendents endorsed a "schedule reduction" plan that encourages Kentucky's public schools to not play private schools.

    According to several published reports, the plan would only be in force during the regular season. The plan also provides exemptions for existing contracts and "longstanding positive relationships."

    You have got to be kidding me.

  • Meetings today on restaurant tax

    A new tax that would force restaurant owners to charge their customers an additional 3 percent to fund to tourism-related programs will be discussed twice today.

    The Lawrenceburg City Council will consider the idea during a 4 p.m. work session at City Hall. The Anderson County Chamber of Commerce will host a meeting at 7:30 p.m. at Bluegrass Community and Technical College, and has invited restaurant owners to share their thoughts.

  • Gilbert's Creek Road reopens

    Gilbert's Creek Road reopened this morning, 10 days after heavy rain caused a section of it to collapse.

    The announcement was made by Anderson County Fiscal Court Magistrate Jason Denny, who represents residents in that area.

    Denny credited county highway foreman Chip Chambers and his crew for getting the road open as fast as possible.

    "They really worked hard," Denny said. "We thought at first it would take two weeks, but it's done ahead of scheduled."