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Today's News

  • Praising God
  • WOULD-BE ACTORS GETTING READY FOR THE CAMERA

    50 YEARS AGO

    Thursday, Sept. 8, 1966

    At the Anderson Fiscal Court meeting Friday, the magistrates voted to contribute $25 to the Anderson County Chamber of Commerce as a contribution to Sidewalk Days.

    They approved payment of $72.50 to J.W. Bailey for work done on Benson Creek Road.

  • Lemonade War becoming tradition at Emma B. Ward

    In only its second year, Emma B. Ward Elementary’s Lemonade War is quickly becoming tradition.

    Fifth-grade students read the book “The Lemonade War” by Jacqueline Davies during summer break. In the book, a brother and sister make a wager on who’s stand can sell the most lemonade.

    After discussing the book and taking assessments, the fifth-graders, split into groups, were given the task of creating their own lemonade stands and advertising campaigns, all in an effort to raise the most money and be crowned the winning Lemonade War team.

  • Wrong on school board, right on vehicle taxes

    Column as I see ’em …

    When I’m wrong, I’ll be the first to admit it, and when it came to my prediction that the board of education wouldn’t grab all it could in additional revenue, boy was I wrong.

    After nearly a decade of holding the line on taxes and cutting spending, the board — James Sargent being the noted exception — went all in last Tuesday night by upping the tax rate as high as it could go without being subjected to a public recall (which would never happen, anyway).

  • Lessons learned as summer wanes

    This summer just flat flew. Join me in a look back at the trends I spotted this year.

    More people are eating beans and squash, in a variety of ways and that’s a good thing. Anytime I can get more people to eat green is welcomed. It’s good for your body. No, I take that back. It is essential to your body. Look up the health benefits and you’ll see.

  • These basic car care tips will keep you safe, save you money

    Whether you’re a car buff or you view your car as just a way to get from point A to point B, it’s important to have a general understanding of your vehicle’s maintenance needs.

    Preventative maintenance is one of the most important ways that you can save money and keep your car running for many years to come. Most preventative maintenance will cost you nothing other than a little bit of your time.

    It’s not too late to give your college-bound son or daughter a review of preventative maintenance. Your car may need maintenance as well.

  • Author draws inspiration from her surroundings

    In May, with the release of “Murder Comes by Mail,” local well-known author Ann Gabhart reached the 30 published books milestone.

    Although her work spans many genres — from inspirational and historical fiction to mystery — one thing is consistent, most of the settings for her novels can be found in and around Anderson County.

  • Changes at the top as Milam, Armstrong sworn in

    A pair of swearing-in ceremonies and a retirement party ushered new leadership into the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office last week.

    New Sheriff Joe Milam made it official when he was sworn in last Wednesday evening before a large crowd of family and friends in the Anderson Circuit Courtroom.

    On Friday, Sgt. Robbie Armstrong was sworn in as Milam’s chief deputy, just days after a huge crowd turned out to bid farewell to outgoing Sheriff Troy Young, who officially retired Aug. 31 after 10 years in office.

  • Family spends Labor Day together — in jail

    From staff reports

    Plenty of Anderson County families spent the Labor Day holiday together, including Joyce Waford and her sons, Justin and Shelby.

    But unlike other families, the Wafords spent their three-day weekend in jail.

    Joyce, Shelby and Justin Waford are all currently housed in the Shelby County Detention Center, each on drug-related charges.

  • Jailer warns: ‘It’s getting very ugly’

    Any hopes that the jail budget would get some relief were dashed in August when the number of prisoners transported came in at a near-record high.

    Jailer Joani Clark reported transporting 117 prisoners during the month, just shy of the record of 123 in May.

    The fiscal court’s jail budget, which runs from July through June, was busted severely last year, forcing magistrates to increase it $83,000, a full 10 percent increase.