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Today's News

  • Easy tips to avoid excessive leftovers

    I don’t like leftovers, especially baked goods.

    There are easy ways to prepare food so there is less leftover. Packaged foods, including pasta salad mixes, macaroni and cheese, one dish meal boxes, cake mixes, and similar items can be prepared by making just a portion of the box.

    You can also make a smaller batch of cookies, cakes, casseroles, rolls, bread, etc.

  • Stink bugs on the rise in Kentucky fields

    Certainly this is the time to be checking your soybeans for the presence of stink bugs.

    I have not noticed economically important problems in the beans I have sampled, but stink bugs are certainly common and our light traps have been capturing very large numbers compared to previous years.

  • City’s restaurant tax still a very bad idea

    By Ben Carlson

    Publisher

    Column as I see ’em …

    The old saw that when the cat’s away the mice will play is sadly all too true.

    After spending years beating back the misguided notion that taxing restaurants will somehow attract tourists — who doesn’t want to pay more for food? — those bent on some kind of a weird restaurant tax caliphate quickly got up to their old tricks not long after I left this job in February for one in New Mexico.

  • 09-10 No Energy Cartoon
  • Former resident charged with stealing money from school district

    By Lisa King

    Landmark News Service

    Benita Anglin, a former payroll manager of the Shelby County Public Schools was arrested Aug. 22, two days after she was indicted for embezzling thousands from the school system.

    Anglin is a former resident of Anderson County.

    Kentucky State Police Detective Jason Propes with KSP’s West Drug Enforcement and Special Investigations Branch, said that Anglin was booked into the Shelby County Detention Center after she turned herself in, not an uncommon occurrence in situations such as hers, he added.

  • Desire to help puts local trooper back on road

    By John Herndon

    Sports Editor

    Mike Carnahan knows some people think he’s crazy for getting back on the road.

    Make that Trooper Mike Carnahan.

    After almost 24 years as a Kentucky State Policeman, and almost another year of retirement, Carnahan rejoined the Thin Gray Line on Aug. 1. He’s working Anderson County, where he’s lived for 12 years.

  • Lipp joins News ad team

    From staff reports

    Stephanie Lipp has joined The Anderson News as a sales representative, the newspaper announced.

    A 1991 graduate of Anderson County High School, Lipp brings a wealth of sales experience to The Anderson News, which includes several years at the Herald-Leader in Lexington and most recently with RevLocal, based in Lexington.

    “I’m excited to be back in my hometown, doing good things for the community that raised me,” said Lipp. “I enjoy building relationships and working to help small businesses succeed.”

  • Carlson returns to News

    From staff reports

    Ben Carlson returned this week as publisher and editor of The Anderson News, the newspaper announced.

    Carlson returns after serving as publisher of the Los Alamos Monitor in Los Alamos, New Mexico, for the past six months. The Monitor is a sister paper of The Anderson News.

    “It’s good to be back,” said Carlson, who served as publisher and editor of The Anderson News from 2006 through February of this year.

  • City council increases tax rate again

    By Ben Carlson

    News staff

    Lawrenceburg property taxes continue to go up after the city council voted 4-2 Monday to increase its tax rate for the fourth consecutive year.

    The council also gave final unanimous approval to a new countywide sign ordinance, which has also received final approval from the Anderson County Fiscal Court.

    Voting for the tax rate increase were council members Sandy Goodlett, Ken Evans and George Geoghegan and Steven Rucker. Voting against the increase were council members Paul Thomas Vaughn and Bobby Durr.

  • Mom pleads guilty to tying up daughter

    By Ben Carlson

    News staff

    With the specter looming of having her child’s grandmother testify on behalf of prosecutors, the mother charged with tying up her then- 3-year-old daughter for up to 16 hours a day pleaded guilty Monday just before her trial was to begin.