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Today's News

  • Revamped staff fuels excitement but results on field are what counts

    I probably learned more about football while sitting under a shade tree and drinking tea than I could by watching the NFL Network 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Of course it helped that I lived near Alton and I was visiting my neighbor, Buddy Ryan.

    At the time, he was one of the hot names in the NFL as he had coached that incredible defense of the 1985 Chicago Bears and then coached the Philadelphia Eagles and Arizona Cardinals. All the while, he was living in Anderson County in the off-season and sometimes held impromptu lessons in the game.

  • Madison Southern set to rule district again; Louisville schools await

    For the last two years, Madison Southern has had its way in Class 5A, District 6. It figures to be the same again in 2017.

    It is ironic that the Eagles have so dominated the district over that time with an average winning margin of nearly four touchdowns. In the previous 10 years, Madison Southern had compiled a 41-67 record and saw perhaps the greatest player in the program’s history, Damien Harris, head to the University of Alabama after the 2014 season.

  • Bearcats eye return to glory

    The last two years have not seen real Anderson County football.

    Oh, the Bearcats have run onto the home field wearing those red jerseys, white pants and white helmets. The band has been playing the “Washington and Lee Swing” and the stands have generally been packed unless it has been raining.

  • Bearcats open grid season Friday at Clark

    When Anderson County travels to Winchester Friday night, it’s doubtful that grabbing a case of Ale-8-One will be on the Bearcats’ minds.

    Anderson opens the 2017 football season at George Rogers Clark just up the road from where the regionally famous soft drink is bottled but that is about the only thing Bearcat coach Mark Peach believes will be soft about Clark County when his team hits town.

  • Questioning motives on changing rules for public notices

    Column as I see ’em …

    State lawmakers are working their tails off this year on a super-important issue.

    Just ask them.

    No, it’s not solving the state retirement boondoggle they are solely responsible for creating. Instead, they’re bent on doing all they can to operate with as little transparency as possible and couching it behind a lie that doing so will save you money.

    What a surprise, eh?

  • Here are best ways to treat lawns for ants

    Several species of ants are common landscape residents. They nest in places that meet their needs: suitable soil type and drainage, convenient food sources, and in some cases, sheltering rocks or logs.

    We most commonly share greenspace with field ants, pavement ants and larger yellow ants. Mounds of soil excavated by ants make turf bumpy and smother grass around the openings.

  • Pass survival skills down to children

    You could say I got my start on this day, 90 years ago. History shapes us all, whether we realize it or not. Those who know me, know that I’ve never met a stranger, am fairly athletic and love to share stories with humor. In my much younger days I danced, a lot. I got all those traits from my father, Jack.

  • ‘Hopestock’ coming to Lawrenceburg Green

    By Brittany Fuller

    News staff

    Anderson County HEROES (Helping Educate Reaching Out Ending Stigma) is planning a new event to bring hope and recovery to struggling addicts and their families in Anderson County.

  • Humane Society, candle maker team up for fundraiser

    The Anderson County Humane Society has partnered with the Candleberry Company for a new campaign next month called “Flip this Kennel.”

    In hopes to raise money for kennel repairs, the Humane Society will hold a Candleberry sale at the Legion Hall on Sept. 9 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. If they do not sell out they will also hold the sale open from 1-4 p.m. on Sept. 10.

  • Advancements in DNA laid before state Judiciary panel

    FRANKFORT—Laura Sudkamp with the Kentucky State Police crime lab remembers when it took months to process one DNA sample.

    “You literally had to stick the film in the freezer for six to eight weeks,” the KSP Central Lab manager told the Interim Joint Committee on Judiciary last week, according to a news release. Her lab can now generate a profile on a DNA sample in one or two days, she said, but even that’s a bit longer than need be under some new technology.