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Today's News

  • State funds OK’d to resurface part of Highway 749

    By Ben Carlson, News staff

    The Anderson County Fiscal Court voted last Tuesday to accept nearly $500,000 in state funds, the bulk of which will be used to resurface 4.9 miles of state highway 749 between Hickory Grove and Bonds Mill roads.

    Magistrates approved the state’s recommendation to spend $335,588 on that portion of the road, but rejected the recommendation to use the balance of the funds — $151,063 — to pave an additional two miles of that road.

  • Our neighbors are doing what we can’t

    By Ben Carlson, Publisher/Editor

    Column as I see ’em …

    Forgive me if I sound a bit frustrated this week.

    It seems that every time opportunity knocks in Anderson County, we aren’t able to respond in the ways our neighbors can.

    I spent a good deal of time during the past week asking questions about chicken swaps, truck and tractor pulls and swimming pools, only to walk away from every conversation shaking my head.

  • Chill requires patience when planting

    Winter in spring? Well, we just had the Dogwood Winter and all I can say is don’t let the door hit you on your way out. As we usher in May, more blooms are on the way, and I for one sincerely hope we don’t get any more frosts.

    The old fashioned way of farming depended on a lot of observation before all the work began. Weathermen weren’t on the air telling people what to do to protect their crops. Keen observations of Mother Nature saved the day.

  • Take precautions to avoid tick bites

    Lone star tick nymphs and adults are active now. American dog tick adults will be looking for hosts soon, too.

    Personal protection, frequent self-inspection and prompt tick removal are keys to reducing tick bites and potential health consequences.

    Ticks can be encountered throughout the Kentucky outdoors. They are most common in overgrown vegetation along forest edges and trails commonly transited by deer and other wildlife.

  • Select local foods for healthy eating

    Using local foods is a way you can support local growers and perhaps eat healthier. I say perhaps because freshness depends on how much time lapses between harvesting and eating and how the food was stored.

    Consumers want to know that the foods they choose to eat and drink are safe and healthy. At the same time, today’s food consumer expects great taste, convenience and good economic value. Sometimes it’s difficult to get all that in one package.

  • Skeletal remains ID’d

    Ben Carlson, News staff

    The skeletal remains of a man found last fall in western Anderson County were identified last week.

    The remains were of Justin Michael Smith, 27, of Indianapolis, according to Anderson County Coroner Mark Tussey.

    The cause of Smith’s death is not known.

    “There is no evidence of blunt force trauma,” Tussey said, “and no evidence of penetrating trauma.”

    Smith disappeared about a year ago but wasn’t found until last fall when hunters came across his remains.

  • Firefighters douse trailer fire

    Firefighters were able to douse a trailer fire that broke out around 8 a.m. today at 1141 Versailles Road, lot 43. Chief Bobby Hume of the Lawrenceburg Fire Department said the cause of the fire, which filled the trailer with smoke and forced firefighters to break out several windows, was likely electrical. A woman was home at the time and appeared uninjured. For a full report, see Wednesday’s edition of The Anderson News.

  • 25 years and some Nasty memories

    Twenty-five years and I still can’t believe it.

    But yes, it’s been 25 years since people in these parts wanted to “Get Nasty.”

    A quarter of a century since people who think a Hammer is something you hit a nail with were dancing to “You Can’t Touch This.”

    Twenty-five years since Wire-To-Wire, Eric Davis and Jose Rijo.

    And Billy Bates.

    If you don’t remember Billy Bates, well, on second thought, if you remotely care about the Cincinnati Reds, you remember Billy Bates.

  • SIMS JUMPS PAST LONG-STANDING MARK

    The nature of track and field is that records are made to be broken. That it took 50 years for someone to set a new Anderson County High School record for the girls’ long jump shows just how impressive both the new record is and the old mark was.

    Sophomore Alorra Sims soard 17-feet-3.5-inches Saturday in the Heart of the Bluegrass meet at Henry Clay High School in Lexington. Sims, considered one of the top jumpers in Kentucky, bested a school mark set in 1965 by Charlene Peyton, who leaped 16-11 at a time when girls’ track was in its infancy in Kentucky.

  • Team Blake adds an all-American

    By Ashley Wilkins, Landmark News Service

    In 2012, Blake Hundley – just 6-years-old at the time – was diagnosed with brain cancer.

    And in the last three years he has battled and beat cancer time and time again.

    A great-grandson of Mt. Eden residents Junie and Phyllis Temple, Shelby County’s poster boy of inspiration has been in our thoughts for several years, but more recently he’s captured the heart of his own hero, University of Kentucky basketball all-American Willie Cauley-Stein.