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Today's News

  • Egg hunt is March 29 at Legion

    The annual Community Easter Egg Hunt is scheduled for Sunday, March 29 at the American Legion, located at 725 W. Broadway in Lawrenceburg.

    The hunt will begin at 1 p.m., organizers said in a news release.

    The hunt will include over 8,000 eggs and is for children ages 1 to 12, who will attempt to win prize baskets and find eggs that include money.

  • Fort Harrod equine clinic is March 21

    Horse owners can prepare for spring riding season during Fort Harrod Back Country Horsemen’s annual health clinic, slated for Saturday, March 21 at Big Red Stables, Harrodsburg, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

    Equine dentist Jon Jazdzewski will float teeth for $55 and veterinarian Justin Murray will offer the following vaccines:

    Vetera Gold (7 way), which includes West Nile Virus for $65.

    Rabies for $10.

    Coggins and health certificate for $30 each.

    Botulism booster for $25.

  • Magic show to raise money for DARE

    A magic and illusion show is scheduled for 7 p.m. Friday, March 20 at Robert B. Turner Elementary School to raise money for the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office’s DARE program.

    Tickets are $8, with children 5 and under admitted free.

    Dinky Gowen: Master of Illusion, is scheduled to perform.

    The show will feature Adrienne Phoenix, Kentucky’s only professional female escape artist and fire eater, and the Houdini straight jacket escape by award winning teen magician, Jake Wisdom.

  • Extension Homemakers offer Festival of Foods

    Sample tastes from the South, Southwest and New England regions of America during the Festival of Foods, sponsored by the Anderson County Extension Homemakers.

    The event is scheduled for 6 p.m. March 24 in the lower level of the Extension office, located at 1026 County Park Road in Lawrenceburg.

    Tickets are $5 for adults; $2 for students and children under 5 are free. Tickets can be purchased at the Extension office, from an Extension Homemaker for at the door.

  • Louisville professor to discuss quilt art

    A discussion on the art of quilting is scheduled for 7 p.m. March 19 at the Anderson Senior Center.

    The program is free and open to the public.

    Pearlie M. Johnson will present a program titled “Quilt Art: Examining the Narrative in Kentucky Quilts.”

    Johnson is an assistant professor of Pan-African Studies and Art History at the University of Louisville.

  • Things to do

    Relay For Life calendar

    The Relay For Life team with Commonwealth Credit Union in Lawrenceburg will host the following events to help raise money for this year’s Relay For Life, scheduled for June 12.

    April 13: Dairy Queen will donate 10 percent of proceeds from sales between 5 and 8 p.m. to Relay For Life

    April 14: CCU team meeting, 6 p.m., Patriot Hall, American Legion Park

    May 11: Dairy Queen will donate 10 percent of proceeds from sales between 5 and 8 p.m. to Relay For Life

  • Pierian Club meets March 19

    The Lawrenceburg Pierian Woman’s Club is scheduled to meet Thursday, March 19 at the Anderson Public Library.

    The 6:30 p.m. meeting will include a salad buffet with Beta Sigma Phi and a business meeting.

    Music will be provided by McKenna Lewis, winner of this year’s Distinguished Young Woman of Anderson County.

    Guests are welcome.

    For more information call Maxye Henry at 839-1232.

  • It’s a good time to be a criminal

    By Ben Carlson

    Column as I see ’em …

    It would be easy to slam the state’s Board of Corrections for allowing Lawrenceburg resident Kris Mitchell to serve just two years of a 10-year sentence for a rash of burglaries, some of them involving guns, for crying out loud.

    Instead, I’ll slam the state legislature that a couple of years ago created God-awful HB 463, which basically allows crooks and schnooks a get-out-jail early card, provided their crimes are non-violent.

  • Frog serenade a sure sign of spring

    We’ve all heard the saying “when one door closes, another one opens.” Well, I’m slamming the door on winter and opening it for spring. Hallelujah! Though hiking up and down my driveway in 2 feet of snow gets me into great shape for gardening, let’s be realistic — muck boots and Carhartts are hardly business casual attire.

  • Don’t let emerald ash borers win in 2015

    The most severe emerald ash borer (EAB) attacks in Kentucky are focused in the triangular area bounded by Louisville, Lexington and northern Kentucky.

    Management

    Kentuckians who live in counties where EAB has been detected should determine the numbers and sizes of ash trees on their properties and decide on a course of action. Managing Emerald Ash Borer: Decision Guide is a good tool to use. In general, ash trees can be saved if they are:

    Healthy and growing vigorously with 75 percent or more of their leaves.