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Today's News

  • Haile goes from homeless to helping homeless

    By Shelley Spillman

    News staff

    On a weekly basis, Ralph Haile can be found collecting and meticulously sorting trash bags full of clothing at the Anderson Senior Center for the homeless at the Hope Center in Lexington. Homelessness is a struggle Haile is well acquainted with as a former homeless teenager on the streets of Detroit.

    Though it was a long time ago, it seems like just yesterday to Haile, who can recall sleeping on the floor of an old shop with a busted pipe that drizzled water from the ceiling and down a wall.

  • Car hits slick spot, crashed on Fox Creek Road
  • 100s ‘like’ 100th birthday story

    From staff reports

    Everyone in Anderson County didn’t wish Lueticia Turner happy birthday, but a sizeable chunk certainly did.

    As of Friday, a story from last week’s paper about Turner celebrating her 100th birthday on Christmas Eve had drawn nearly 500 “likes” from those who follow The Anderson News on its Facebook page, along with 42 comments, most of which included the words happy birthday and merry Christmas.

  • Prediction: Library on losing end of lawsuit

    By Ben Carlson

    Column as I see ’em …

    Were I a gambling man (I’m not, aside from an occasional foolish flutter when the Powerball jackpot soars) I’d bet a week’s pay that the Kentucky Court of Appeals will uphold two previous rulings that our library and others like it broke the law when setting tax rates over the past several decades.

  • Pressure on next year for great gift giver

    I pride myself on thoughtful gift giving. I believe that everyone has a Christmas talent.

    My mother and husband can wrap presents with the precision that would rival any North Pole elf. My sister-in-law Jessica is the queen of holiday cocktails and fun group activities like board games, cards and trivia. My father’s holiday talent is fairly new. He’s learned to shop for mom without my help after I moved to Kentucky nearly three years ago.

  • How to manage high tunnel insect pests

    While growers can potentially find any type of insect pest in the high tunnel, whiteflies and thrips are the most common, and the most troublesome.

    In addition to insects, several species of mites are serious and common pests. These pests have several characteristics in common that makes them difficult to manage, including multiple generations per cropping cycle and small body size (thus, they are hard to find when populations are low). In addition, there are relatively few pesticides that are effective against these pests.

  • Make 2015 a year of good things

    Another year ends as a new year begins. Think of all the possibilities ahead of us. It’s only 365 days, but we sure pack a lot of life into them. Before all the merriment begins, I’d like to remind you of some very important things you should do today.

  • Plenty of options for the lactose intolerant

    Lactose intolerance is a common disorder that affects adults.

    About 75 percent of all people in the world have too little lactase to some degree. If you’re African-American, Asian, Hispanic or Native American, you are more likely to have it.

    Lactose intolerance isn’t the same as a food allergy to milk. It means the body can’t easily digest lactose, which is a type of natural sugar found in milk and dairy products.

  • Police: Man used booze to coerce sex from boy

    From staff reports

    A Frankfort man is in jail for allegedly giving alcohol to a 16-year-old Lawrenceburg youth and attempting to have sex with him, according to a report on file in Anderson District Court.

    Henry J. Coots, 34, “coerced the juvenile male into drinking several shots of vodka with him in order to get [him] intoxicated” while at his residence, located at 110 1/2 Arnett Ave., Frankfort, according to a report filed by officer Joe Massey of the Lawrenceburg Police Department.

  • Pipeline easements returned to landowners

    From staff reports

    Anderson County residents who sold easements to the developers of the defunct Bluegrass Pipeline project now have their land back and get to keep the money.

    An estimated 44 easements purchased by the developer were released last week, according to documents on file at the Anderson County Clerk’s Office.

    The developer suspended its investments in the controversial pipeline in April following months of debate over what some considered potential environmental impact and the company’s declared right of eminent domain.