Today's News

  • Fun in the Sun
  • Anderson native named communications director for Bridgestone Americas

    Tire and rubber manufacturer Bridgestone Americas announced that Emily Baker Richard, a daughter of Darrell and Jean Baker of Lawrenceburg, has joined its team as its director of communications, according to a news release.

    Richard will be responsible for defining strategies and managing communications pertaining to Bridgestone America’s reputation, teammates, operations and businesses across its manufacturing sites/communities throughout North America and in Africa.

  • Volunteer trainer given the boot

    A longtime volunteer trainer with the Anderson County High School varsity football team was told to leave the sidelines at halftime of last Friday’s home opener and it isn’t clear yet if he will be allowed back for future games.

    Brad Briscoe, a physical therapy assistant with Lawrenceburg Physical Therapy who has provided trainer services for a variety of school athletic teams at no cost for the past 17 years, was told to leave the sidelines as he and the team were making their way into the locker at halftime.

  • $100K a year for tourism?

    Details are emerging on a plan that would merge city and county tourism efforts, including how much money the fiscal court might be willing to spend to fund it.

    Judge-Executive Orbrey Gritton said last Friday that his goal is to fund the new tourism commission with up to $100,000 from the county’s general fund, more than three times the level of tourism funding in the current county budget.

  • Living with Danger

    Brian Flood sighs briefly then responds when asked what is going to happen if something isn’t done to fix the road in front of his house.

    “Someone is going to get killed, and chances are it’s going to be me or someone in my house,” Flood said while seated with friends who had gathered Monday evening on the front porch of neighbors Jerry and Lisa Hughes.

  • Cleanup complete after tanker ruptures on Graefenburg Road

    A spill that dumped estimated 1,000 gallons of gasoline into Jerry and Lisa Hughes’ front yard when a tanker truck left the road and smashed into a tree last Tuesday on Graefenburg Road was largely cleaned up by Thursday.

    A team from Southern Environmental Services out of Bowling Green was at the wreck site Wednesday and had already dug up an estimated 600 tons of dirt that was saturated with gasoline.

  • Stopping trucks on Hwy 151 can be done

    Column as I see ’em …

    One of these days you’re going to pick up a copy of this newspaper and read all about how a family was killed when a tractor-trailer plowed through their home on Graefenburg Road — aka State Highway 151 — in Alton.

    It nearly happened last week when gas tanker plowed through five yards and miraculously didn’t explode when it struck a tree.

  • Visit to middle school cafeteria surprisingly pleasant

    Long before gluten was widely touted as the root of all evil and kale became the green of everlasting life, lunch was my favorite subject during school.

    I remember the guessing game my friends would play during our long march to the cafeteria, were we going to be treated to huge cinnamon rolls and savory chili today. Surely to goodness there would be chocolate pudding.

  • Fair time equals ‘cotton candy’ in trees

    We are less than one month away from fall. Yes, Sept. 23 is just around the corner, but has anyone else already noticed a slight change in the plants? I know my Echinacea, aka purple coneflower, has already gone to seed and the birds are loving it. Some locust leaves have started turning as well. Can we say climate change?

  • Popular, low-calorie and fat-free, eggplant is always in season

    Eggplant is a favorite in many areas of the South.

    Thomas Jefferson, who experimented with many varieties of plants in his Virginia garden, is credited with introducing eggplant to North America.

    Eggplant is a member of the nightshade family and is native to India. Eggplant is related to potatoes, tomatoes and peppers.