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Today's News

  • A humbling surprise

    Ben Carlson, News staff

    He processes hundreds of deer each year, but none give Denny Markwell as much pleasure as those he cuts and wraps for children who participate in the annual youth hunts organized by officers with Kentucky Fish and Wildlife.

    Markwell, owner of Markwell’s Deer Processing on Bruner Road, doesn’t charge a fee for processing those deer but was rewarded for his efforts recently by being selected the 6th District Sportsman of the Year.

  • National Day of Prayer is May 7

    By Ben Carlson, News staff

    This year’s National Day of Prayer is scheduled for Thursday, May 7 from 12:15 to 12:45 p.m. at the Anderson County Courthouse, according to a news release.

    The annual event is open to “all followers of Christ,” said Minister Terry Cooper of Ninevah Chistian Church.

  • Church news briefs, April 29, 2015

    Churches to celebrate National Prayer Day Eve

    Six area congregations are planning a joint 7 p.m. worship service to mark the eve of the National Day of Prayer, according to a news release.

    Participating churches are Alton Baptist, Evergreen Baptist, Lawrenceburg Trinity Church, New Life Christian Fellowship, Open Bible and Second Christian.

    The service will be held Wednesday, May 6 at Alton Baptist Church. Alton is located on US 127 North between Lawrenceburg and Frankfort.

  • THE WAY WE WERE: COACH HURT WHEN CEILING FALLS DURING MEETING

    Compiled by Janie Bowen

    50 YEARS AGO

    Thursday, April 29, 1965

    Three win superior

    Three of eight Anderson County students who participated in the state Speech Festival held at the University of Kentucky received superior ratings.

    Mary Jane York, Anderson High, received a superior in Oratory; Lanie Wright and Jeff Hodson, students at Saffell Elementary School, received superior ratings in poetry and prose divisions respectively.

  • City firefighters save woman’s home from fire

    Ben Carlson, News staff

    This time, the trailer survived.

    A fire damaged but didn’t destroy a woman’s house trailer on Versailles Road, thanks to quick action by the Lawrenceburg Fire Department and some remodeling of the structure.

    The fire broke out around 8 a.m. Monday at 1141 Versailles Road, Lot 43, in a home owned by Jacqueline Lendrum, who was home when it broke out but escaped without injury, according to Lawrenceburg Fire Chief Bobby Hume.

  • State funds OK’d to resurface part of Highway 749

    By Ben Carlson, News staff

    The Anderson County Fiscal Court voted last Tuesday to accept nearly $500,000 in state funds, the bulk of which will be used to resurface 4.9 miles of state highway 749 between Hickory Grove and Bonds Mill roads.

    Magistrates approved the state’s recommendation to spend $335,588 on that portion of the road, but rejected the recommendation to use the balance of the funds — $151,063 — to pave an additional two miles of that road.

  • Our neighbors are doing what we can’t

    By Ben Carlson, Publisher/Editor

    Column as I see ’em …

    Forgive me if I sound a bit frustrated this week.

    It seems that every time opportunity knocks in Anderson County, we aren’t able to respond in the ways our neighbors can.

    I spent a good deal of time during the past week asking questions about chicken swaps, truck and tractor pulls and swimming pools, only to walk away from every conversation shaking my head.

  • Chill requires patience when planting

    Winter in spring? Well, we just had the Dogwood Winter and all I can say is don’t let the door hit you on your way out. As we usher in May, more blooms are on the way, and I for one sincerely hope we don’t get any more frosts.

    The old fashioned way of farming depended on a lot of observation before all the work began. Weathermen weren’t on the air telling people what to do to protect their crops. Keen observations of Mother Nature saved the day.

  • Take precautions to avoid tick bites

    Lone star tick nymphs and adults are active now. American dog tick adults will be looking for hosts soon, too.

    Personal protection, frequent self-inspection and prompt tick removal are keys to reducing tick bites and potential health consequences.

    Ticks can be encountered throughout the Kentucky outdoors. They are most common in overgrown vegetation along forest edges and trails commonly transited by deer and other wildlife.

  • Select local foods for healthy eating

    Using local foods is a way you can support local growers and perhaps eat healthier. I say perhaps because freshness depends on how much time lapses between harvesting and eating and how the food was stored.

    Consumers want to know that the foods they choose to eat and drink are safe and healthy. At the same time, today’s food consumer expects great taste, convenience and good economic value. Sometimes it’s difficult to get all that in one package.