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Today's News

  • Serious flaws evident in plan to reduce schools' sports schedules

    There are times you see or hear something, shake your head in disbelief, then look again.

    And you shake your head even more.

    In case you missed it, last Thursday, the Kentucky Association of School Superintendents endorsed a "schedule reduction" plan that encourages Kentucky's public schools to not play private schools.

    According to several published reports, the plan would only be in force during the regular season. The plan also provides exemptions for existing contracts and "longstanding positive relationships."

    You have got to be kidding me.

  • Meetings today on restaurant tax

    A new tax that would force restaurant owners to charge their customers an additional 3 percent to fund to tourism-related programs will be discussed twice today.

    The Lawrenceburg City Council will consider the idea during a 4 p.m. work session at City Hall. The Anderson County Chamber of Commerce will host a meeting at 7:30 p.m. at Bluegrass Community and Technical College, and has invited restaurant owners to share their thoughts.

  • Gilbert's Creek Road reopens

    Gilbert's Creek Road reopened this morning, 10 days after heavy rain caused a section of it to collapse.

    The announcement was made by Anderson County Fiscal Court Magistrate Jason Denny, who represents residents in that area.

    Denny credited county highway foreman Chip Chambers and his crew for getting the road open as fast as possible.

    "They really worked hard," Denny said. "We thought at first it would take two weeks, but it's done ahead of scheduled."

  • Out of the fire...

    What I write rarely makes me feel foolish.

    Oh, I've made my share of blunders in print, some colossal, some not so much but embarrassing nevertheless.

    But when I finished the short story I promised to read during last Thursday's Stimulating, Ink [a high school writing club] coffeehouse reading at the public library, I summoned all my courage to get up in front of the 40 or so folks there and read it aloud.

  • Lady Cats done in by 'one of those nights'

    It would have been easy to blame cold weather, injuries or both for Anderson County's 2-1 loss to visiting Henry Clay Monday night.

    It would probably be more correct to just chalk it up to the fickle nature of the softball diamond. Some days, a team just doesn't have it. "It was just one of those nights," Anderson coach Brian Glass said. "We hit the ball hard but right at them."

    Indeed. Henry Clay senior Karneisha Johnson gave up just four hits, but got some outstanding defense from those behind her.

  • The 'eyes' have it

    Tammy Caldwell isn't sure what attracted her to Humphrey. It certainly wasn't his good looks, and she acknowledges that he doesn't always smell pleasant and at times can be downright cantankerous.

    Maybe it was his eyes.

    "I don't know why, I just wanted a camel," she said. "Once you see a camel, you fall in love with their eyes. He has the longest eyelashes."

  • Bitter Rivals, Better Buddies

    When Shelby County's Haleigh LeCompte stepped into the batter's box for the first time back on March 29, she knew the sounds coming from behind her.

    "Tiffany was talking," LeCompte says of Anderson County catcher Tiffany Davenport. "She was trying to get me to talk to her."

    If the grins on both faces were any indication, Davenport was successful.

    "The umpire said to me, 'I take it you know each other,'" Davenport says. "I told him, 'We are best friends.'"

  • Camels, camels everywhere I go

    While interviewing Tammy Caldwell last week for a story about Humphrey, the camel she recently acquired, I was reminded of my own association with and interest in camels.

    I've never been inclined to own a camel, but have always been intrigued by them.

    There are two true camels, the one humper or dromedary that inhabits the Sahara and surrounding environs of North Africa, and the Asian or Bactrian camel which has two humps.

  • Proposed use of restaurant tax funds called 'improper'

    Stated plans from local officials on how they would use a proposed 3 percent restaurant tax were called improper Monday by two people who work closely with the tax in other cities.

    The Lawrenceburg City Council is expected to consider the tax - proposed by the Anderson County Tourism Commission - next month. If approved, city and tourism officials say they plan to divide the estimated $320,000 the tax would generate.

    With its share, the tourism commission would hire a director who would double as director of the county's Economic Development Authority.

  • Cats, Shelby to tangle for top spot in district

    They were ranked as the top two baseball teams in the Eighth Region in pre-season. That they are the best of the 30th District has been a given since Anderson County and Shelby County have both advanced to the regional tournament the last three years and nine of the last 11.

    So it is no coincidence that the most anticipated game of the first half of the season comes Thursday night when the Bearcats and Rockets line it up. The first pitch is set for 7:30 p.m. at the Shelby County athletic complex.