Today's News

  • Shelby roars early, holds off Lady Cats for crown

    The home floor was not enough for Anderson County volleyball.

    Armed with the top seed in the 28th District Tournament and hoping that the home crowd would be worth a few extra kills or digs, Anderson still came up short against second-seeded Shelby County in the championship game last Tuesday night.

    Shelby silenced a sparse home crowd early, reeling off the first nine points of game one, then held off an Anderson rally by scoring 10 of the last 13 points in game three to take its first district championship since 2005.

  • Property transfers

    The following property transfers were recently recorded at the Anderson County courthouse.

    CitiFinancial Inc., to Hope L. Kirk, real estate on Indian Ridge Lane, $171,000.

    C.E. and Barbara McAdams, to Emily and Ron Lois, real estate on Ky 1472, quitclaim.

    Jerry W. and Sonyia L. Waldridge, to William D. Jennings Jr. and Jeanne Ceroalo, real estate on Teal Point Drive, $68,000.

    U.S. Bank National Association, to Betty Melloan, real estate on Grant Drive, $66,000.

  • BOYS HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER: Henry Clay defeats Bearcats in regional

    LEXINGTON -- Henry Clay scored in the first two minutes then put Anderson County away in the second half of the 13th Region tournament semifinals Tuesday.

    The host Blue Devils were never threatened. Anderson finally scored late in the game when Seth Beasley connected.

    Anderson finished the season at 12-5-4.

    For a look back at the regional tournament, see the Oct. 29 edition of The Anderson News.

  • COLUMN: No matter what language, final weeks will reveal Cats' mettle

    No language is filled with more cliches and hyperbole than coach-speak.

    You know the routine.

    Writer asks coach about next week's game.

    Coach's reply is "They are a very good football team," or if he is looking at an incredibly weak-sister next up on the schedule, it's "They are about to explode on someone."

    I learned years ago that when a football coach says, "They are a good football team," the translation into real English is, "They are the next team on our schedule."

  • Fire guts trailer on Lock Road

    An Anderson County man lost his Lock Road home and all of its contents in a fire late last Friday afternoon.

    Charles Boyd wasn't home when the fire started, according to Anderson County Fire Chief Mike Barnes.

    "When he came home, heavy smoke was puffing from the trailer," Barnes said. "He went across the road to the fellow who owns the property and called 911."

    When firefighters arrived at the home, located near the end of Lock Road in the 1800 block, the trailer was fully engulfed, Barnes said.

  • Nothing ladylike about them

    Summer brought us a rare hatch of ear-piercing cicadas.

    There’s nothing rare about what fall is likely to bring: an invasion of quieter, but no less pesky, ladybugs.

    Tommy Yankey, Anderson Extension agent for agriculture, issued a warning last week that ladybugs — actually Asian lady beetles — are likely to begin invading homes all across Anderson County as the weather continues to cool.

  • Sudden end to overtime classic

    It was everything one could expect when teams separated by just over 12 miles on the map and two spots in the statewide coaches’ poll got together.

    And more. Much, much more.

    About the only thing that could have made the District 25 girls’ soccer tournament final better for Anderson County would have been to change the result.

  • EDITORIAL: Remember late county clerk on election day

    Lost amid the buzz over Obama vs. McCain and Denny vs. Stratton is the fact that for the first time in a generation Harold Ritchey won't preside over Tuesday's election results.

    Ritchey, the beloved county clerk who passed away this summer while jogging on Broadway, was Anderson County's Rock of Gibraltar when it came to election night, and Tuesday just won't be the same without him.

    As enamored of his job as he was, Ritchey always seemed to love election night more than any other duty he so flawlessly performed.

  • COLUMN: 'W' movie not all that bad

    Election day is finally just around the corner and not a minute too soon.

    I'm not certain I could endure another month of the mindless propaganda that has inundated the American public for the last several months.

    Ethics in politics seems to have gone the way of the passenger pigeon and great auk.

    If they have not accomplished much else, at least the continuing negative attack ads that have been launched at us like kamikaze pilots attacking a battleship, have caused me to wonder about many things political including:

  • Hospital named in genital amputation lawsuit

    Jewish Hospital Shelbyville has now been added to the list of parties being sued by a Waddy man who says his penis was amputated by mistake last fall.

    Phillip Seaton, 61, and his wife, Deborah, filed suit Oct. 7 in Shelby County Circuit Court against the hospital where the surgery was performed last October.

    Seaton previously filed suit against the doctor who performed the surgery, Dr. John Patterson, the anesthesiologist, Dr. Oliver James, as well as Commonwealth Urology, PSC, in Frankfort, which employs Patterson.