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Today's News

  • Hi-tech desert hiking

    I occasionally receive books or articles about hiking, backpacking and river rafting from friends and relatives who are aware of my passion for those activities.

    My brother, who is the very antithesis of an outdoorsman (he believes the great outdoors is the space between the car door and the house door,) recently forwarded a story about Dan Neil's solo sojourn in a desert park west of Los Angeles.

    Neil, a Los Angeles Times staff writer, recently embarked on what was intended to be a 75-mile springtime hike through Joshua Tree National Park.

  • PRP shows why it's ranked No. 1

    LOUISVILLE - Jeremy Turpin has seen a lot of baseball teams but never one like Pleasure Ridge Park.

    "They are the best baseball team I have seen in all my years of playing," the Anderson County shortstop-pitcher said after PRP had demolished Turpin and his Anderson County teammates in the best-of-three semi-state series last week in Louisville.

    By luck or the fact that they are just so good that no other Sixth Region team had a chance to beat them, the Panthers hosted the first round of the state high school baseball tournament on their home field.

  • Trees toppled across town

    What was possibly the largest oak tree in Anderson County was downed during Monday night's storm.

    The tree fell beside the home of Renita and Danny Crouch on Highway 62.

    Tuesday morning, Renita Crouch's aunt, Helen Bowman, was at the home and recounted hearing about the historic tree succumbing to the storm.

    "Renita said Danny looked out the door and said, 'Oh, no, there goes the big oak tree.' " Bowman said. "She called me this morning and said the big oak tree was gone. Renita really thought a lot of that tree."

  • Two examples of life well lived

    The loss of Harold Ritchey and now W.J. Smith leaves a void in Anderson County that will likely never be filled.

    Ritchey, the longtime county clerk, and Smith, a walking encyclopedia of local history and former postmaster, were two shining examples of what life in a small town is about.

    Simply put, they cared about their hometown and the people who live there.

    Ritchey, the affable clerk seen jogging or walking around town morning, noon and night, passed away last Monday after collapsing while jogging on Broadway.

  • 'Class Act' did community, itself proud

    OWENSBORO - Ray Woodyard looked tired Saturday but, like every Anderson County fan, he did not want the Lady Bearcats' run through the state softball tournament to end when it did.

    Members of the Anderson fan contingent shared lawn chairs, sunscreen - thank you, Julie Black - and snapped pictures for each other at the Jack Fisher Softball Complex on the west side of Owensboro. They sat through strong winds that whipped up the dust and caused occasional stoppages in play.

    Like Woodyard, most Anderson fans looked tired.

  • Making the league their own

    OWENSBORO - Jimmy Dugan was wrong.

    No matter what the Tom Hanks character believed, there really is crying in baseball. Anderson County showed it Saturday.

    The tears were subdued, but the red eyes were there after the Lady Bearcats advanced deep in the state tournament Friday and Saturday before dropping a heart-breaker to Ryle, the 2006 state champion, in the consolation bracket semi-final.

    The game was really softball, baseball's close first cousin, but Dugan was wrong nonetheless.

  • Beloved historian W.J. Smith dies at 86

    Anderson County lost the man many regarded as the county's resident historian when William Johnson "W.J." Smith died last Wednesday.

    "I've known him for 50 years," said Helen Shryock, a longtime friend and neighbor of both W.J. and his late wife Nancy. "We met when I moved to Lawrenceburg with my first husband in 1957.

    "W.J. knew every newcomer who came to town. He was very intelligent and remembered everything. He was the best historian we ever had."

    Shryock said Smith was also an extremely kind and considerate man, sentiments that were echoed by others.

  • Community gathers to recall county clerk

    Every pew was full at First Baptist Church on Friday as the community gathered for Harold Ritchey's funeral.

    Ritchey, 64, died June 2 of an apparent heart attack. He was a life-long resident of Anderson County and served as county clerk for 18 years.

    Robert F. Ehr spoke at the service, and recounted Ritchey's life and the many community and leadership positions he held over the years.

    Ehr described Ritchey as a dedicated public servant and someone who always had a smile on his face.

  • Storm destroys Healing Field, damages legion's grandstand

    Straight-line winds nearing 50 mph destroyed Lawrenceburg's Healing Field, removed a large section of the grandstand at Legion Park and fell trees across the city Monday night.

    The Healing Field, the only permanent healing field in the nation which serves as memorial to soldiers killed in the ongoing wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, sustained major damage. Strong winds ripped a number of flags from their poles, strewing them across the ground. Other poles were bent to the ground, and the rest sustained damage.

  • Storm wrecks Healing Field, damages grandstand

    A powerful storm Monday night pummeled the American Legion Auxiliary's Healing Field and tore off a large section of the grandstands at American Legion Park.

    The storm, which began about 10 p.m., toppled trees across the city and killed power to a number of homes.

    As of Tuesday morning, it was still too early to assess just how much damage was done at the park and what affect it might have on the upcoming Lawrenceburg Fair and Horse Show, scheduled to begin June 21.

    For full coverage of Monday's storm, see Wednesday's edition of The Anderson News.