.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • ‘We will miss him terribly

    An Anderson County Sheriff’s deputy died Sunday night following a lengthy illness.

    Donnie Lee Sutherland, 70, died at his residence, according to obituary information posted at the website for Gash Memorial Chapel.

    Sutherland was a longtime deputy and previously worked as a police officer with the Lawrenceburg Police Department.

    Funeral services will be 1 p.m. Thursday at First Baptist Church, with Bro. Fred Knickerbocker and Bro. Garrett Franklin officiating. Burial will follow in Lawrenceburg Cemetery.

  • Anderson class of 1967 plans 50th reunion

    While the rest of America in 1967 was embroiled in everything from the war in Vietnam to the Summer of Love, Anderson High School seniors had other, less pressing things on their minds.

    “We had the Fairgrounds Drive-In,” said Peggy Robinson-Dixon, as she and her classmates shared memories while preparing for their upcoming 50th class reunion next month at Wild Turkey Trace golf course.

    “That was our hangout.”

  • Did your road make the grade?

    Without a word of debate or dissent, the Anderson County Fiscal Court last Tuesday unanimously approved this year’s road paving list at a cost of nearly $750,000.

    Previous versions of the fiscal court bickered endlessly over which roads were to be paved. Magistrates lobbied hard for roads in their own districts, particularly 6th District Magistrate Kenny Barnett, who oversees by far the most miles of sparsely populated county highways in Anderson County.

  • Are local monument’s days numbered?

    Like it or not, the Confederate soldier statue in front of our glorious old county courthouse is an endangered species.

    Like nearly every social construct or traditional value, monuments to those who fought on the losing end of the Civil War are and will continue to be under withering assault from those who loathe our nation’s founding, and in particular, its founders.

    No pun intended, but those radicals are like patience on a statue, and are relentless in their incremental approach to force the changes they want.

  • Kentucky Music Hall of Fame honors all kinds of music

    It’s almost impossible to measure what impact the state of Kentucky has had on the music industry but the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame and museum is a place that tells the stories of singers, instrumentalists, song writers, and others from the state who have played even a small part in the rich and diverse music heritage the state enjoys.

  • State fair harkens back to days of self-reliance

    It’s state fair time. Growing up, visiting the state fair was a big to-do. My cousins all had animals to show and I used to envy them getting to stay at the fair overnight. I’m sure it was an adventure, but not very comfortable.

    I loved walking through the barns and then watching the shows. That was a lot of responsibility for kids and they did it all, feed, water, bathe, groom, repeat. They did it night after night and won ribbons and money for their hard work. Never mess with a kid who can walk a cow on a leash.

  • Are local monument’s days numbered?

    Like it or not, the Confederate soldier statue in front of our glorious old county courthouse is an endangered species.

    Like nearly every social construct or traditional value, monuments to those who fought on the losing end of the Civil War are and will continue to be under withering assault from those who loathe our nation’s founding, and in particular, its founders.

    No pun intended, but those radicals are like patience on a statue, and are relentless in their incremental approach to force the changes they want.

  • City tax rates to remain flat

    City taxpayers won’t likely pay a higher property tax rate this fall.

    The Lawrenceburg City Council heard a first reading last week to keep its property tax rate flat at $1.95 per $1,000 in assessed value, along with lowering the tax rate on personal property from $3.07 per $1,000 to $2.35.

    The property tax rate is expected to generate about $10,000 more than it did the year before, thanks for a slight uptick in growth during the past year, after several years of declining property values.

  • Seniors upset after Adult Day facility closes its doors

    After being a part of the community for over 25 years, Anderson County Adult Day closed its doors last Friday.

    The program was part of the Bluegrass Community Action, and those locally seeking day care for the elders in their lives will now have to look in surrounding counties for a center to which they can take them.

    Executive Director Troy Roberts did not respond to questions about why the facility closed.

  • Commission begins hammering out new tourism director’s role

    The joint Lawrenceburg/Anderson County Tourism Commission is working quickly to engage its new Executive Director Kendall Clinton into the community, and spent last week’s meeting diving deeper into defining his position.

    Almost two weeks into his new role, the discussion mostly focused on items such as approvals for Clinton to join other tourism associations, approval for incidental spending, and a discussion of whether the new executive director should have a flex schedule.