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Today's News

  • Two-spotted spider mites can be formidable pests

    The two-spotted spider mite (TSSM) is a common and destructive pest with an extremely wide host range that includes many trees, shrubs, flowers, weeds, fruits, and vegetable crops. Problems increase during hot, dry weather but early signs and symptoms are easy to overlook. Not only are these mites tiny but they live out of sight on the underside of leaves (Figure 1).

  • NEARLY READY TO GO

    By Ashley Wilkins

    Landmark News Service

    With less than three weeks until opening day for The Outlet Shoppes of the Bluegrass, construction workers on the property are hard at work.

    The 365,000-square-foot retail center located just south of Interstate 64 in Simpsonville is scheduled for a VIP opening on July 30 and the grand opening July 31.

  • Tourism commission agrees to spend more than $3,000 for fair booth

    The newly appointed Anderson County Tourism Commission unanimously decided to set up a booth at the Kentucky State Fair on Thursday of last week.

    They commission expects to spend around $3,350 for the state fair booth from August 14-28. The cost breaks down as $2,000 for booth rental, $150 for electricity at the booth, around $200 for extra tickets for volunteers and at least $1,000 for promotional handouts and brochures.

    The meeting also cast doubt on the possibility of a joint city and county tourism commission becoming a reality at present time.

  • Red Cross helps Keeling rebuild after devastating house fire

    When Donald Keeling lost his rental home in an electrical fire, he wasn’t thinking about seeking out the American Red Cross, but they sought him out.

    Keeling lived at a rental property on Fairview Road for 14 years. He was cooking breakfast on the morning of July 1 when he smelled something burning. He checked and saw his living room was ablaze. He attempted to put water on the fire, but quickly realized it was beyond his control and he had to get out.

  • Fiscal court appoints new tourism board members

    Anderson County Fiscal Court appointed new members to the Anderson County Tourism Commission Tuesday of last week.

    Fiscal court appointed Brad Barfield of Hunter’s Grill, Pam Brough, president of the Anderson County Chamber of Commerce, Stewart Gritton, who has a long history of working on fair boards, Todd Hyatt of the Lawrenceburg Best Western, Megan Hoskins of the Lawrenceburg Best Western, Nicki Bryant of the Wild Turkey distillery and George Leamon, executive director of the Lawrenceburg-Anderson County Economic Development Authority.

  • Original song, original sound, age-old dream

    The journey started with only a tiny bit of fanfare in Anderson County. If the dream comes true, it will make it all the way to Nashville.

    And beyond.

    “My first performance was at Western School,” Rayna Warford says with a big smile. “I was five years old and it was a talent contest. I was the youngest contestant there, but I won.”

  • Church raises $6,200 for military footstones

    A Fairview Christian Church project of more than two years to honor deceased veterans recently came to fruition.

    Wayne Darnell, a Fairview Christian Church member, places flags on all of the veterans’ graves at the church’s cemetery.

    He looked at the dates on the graves and noticed there were several veterans with no mention of their military service.

    Darnell got the church behind his mission to make sure every veteran was honored for his or her service.

  • New sign ordinances are designed to be explicit, user friendly

    The city, county and Anderson County Chamber of Commerce worked together to draft new sign ordinances designed to be more explicit and easier to follow.

    The sign ordinance draft was presented at an Anderson County Fiscal Court meeting Tuesday of last week.

    The new proposed sign ordinances outline each sign and gives a glossary of definitions for popular signage from an abandoned sign to a window sign.

  • Is the T.B. Ripy mansion haunted?

    Jeff Waldridge, paranormal investigator and owner of the Lawrenceburg Ghost Walk, says benevolent spirits attached to the house, possibly even Thomas B. Ripy himself, haunts the Ripya mansion.

    Waldridge, a lifelong Lawrenceburg resident, has been working on the Lawrenceburg Ghost Walk for about 3 years, compiling research through microfilm at the Anderson Public Library, Kentucky Historical Society documents and The Anderson News clippings from the 1900s.

    The end product fuses history with the paranormal to give tourists a memorable experience.

  • Affordable Care Act has not replaced the need for the free clinic

    Kim Brown is not one to look a gift horse in the mouth.

    A couple of years ago, the 57-year-old diabetic was between a rock and a hard place. She needed frequent blood tests to get medication but couldn’t afford the tests that cost around $1,500 per month.

    Her health had deteriorated to the point that she was in constant pain.

    While reading The Anderson News one day, she found information about what would become her salvation - the Anderson County Community Medical Clinic, a free service to qualifying patients.