Today's News

  • Want to show off your big hunting prize? We can help

    If you have taken a big prize while hunting, you can share your big moment on the pages of The Anderson News.

    Just send a photo, set to the highest possible resolution, directly to The Anderson News. You can utilize The Anderson News website, www.theandersonnews.com or email directly to jpherndon@theandersonnews.com. Be sure to include an email address or a daytime phone number where you can be contacted.

    Be sure to include all the pertinent info such as the size of the animal, where you were hunting and any other importante information.

  • School to honor fallen trooper

    Christian Academy of Lawrenceburg plans to honor fallen Kentucky State Trooper Eric Chrisman between the school’s volleyball and basketball games Saturday, Nov. 14.

    The ceremony is scheduled to begin at approximately 3 p.m.

    Chrisman died June 23 when his cruiser was involved in an accident while responding to a reckless driving complaint in Livingston County. He was only six months into his career as a state policeman.

  • Council to consider new streetscape as merchants voice concerns over trees

    Downtown merchants’ concerns over trees blocking the signs on their buildings sparked a discussion during Monday night’s Lawrenceburg City Council meeting that could lead to the city rethinking Main Street’s overall appearance.

    The council also discussed tweaking its alcohol regulations, including how the Wild Turkey Trace golf course is classified, and heard its police chief laud citizen support of his officers.

  • Teen hurt when car slams tree

    A 19-year-old man had to be airlifted to an area hospital after the car he was driving struck a phone pole and tree Monday afternoon on Bishop Street in Tyrone.

    Markus Beasley sustained head and chest injuries after his car veered off Bishop Street. It sideswiped a phone pole, continued on and struck a tree just several yards in front of a child’s swingset.

    Witnesses said he was driving much too fast for the narrow street when his car missed a curve and crashed.

  • Treacherous road repairs to begin

    Squeaky wheels apparently do get greased.

    Following years of complaints about having their homes hit or nearly hit by cars careening off Alton Road, residents along the narrow stretch of state highway are expected to start getting relief later this week.

    Work is scheduled to begin Thursday to add 6 to 8 feet of shoulder to the area of the road where cars and trucks routinely veer off the road, down an embankment and headlong toward several homes.

  • Revenue bond OK’d to help Florida Tile expand

    By Jonna Spelbring Priester

    Landmark News Service

    The Anderson County Fiscal Court last week gave preliminary approval of an industrial revenue bond that would help expand Florida Tile.

    George Leamon, executive directory of the Lawrenceburg-Anderson County Economic Development Authority, said the bond would allow the county to abate taxes.

  • Local trio featured in KET documentary

    Three Lawrenceburg men will be included in a behind-the-scenes look at the Kentucky Chautauqua program next Monday and Wednesday on KET.

    The documentary will feature Marty Harley, Greg Breeding and Jim Sayre, each of who travel the state to portray historical characters as part of the Chautauqua program.

    Harley and Breeding portray the Carlisle Brothers, two of the pioneers of country music who were raised in nearby Wakefield, a small community near Taylorsville.

    Sayre portrays Abe Lincoln.

  • Fun with God First Soccer
  • Bevin looks to Indiana model to replace Kynect

    By Melissa Patrick

    Kentucky Health News

    From a Republican nomination won by only 83 votes to an unexpected 84,764-vote election margin, Matt Bevin will be Kentucky’s next governor, and that means the way Kentucky has embraced the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is about to change.

  • Hoping to see Matt ride at least one more time

    I gingerly held my dad’s hand as he laid in a hospital bed watching Marshal Matt Dillon tear across the TV screen aboard his trusty horse.

    His body weakened by cancer and a calamity of other illnesses ranging from pneumonia to staph infections, watching episodes of the old TV show “Gunsmoke” seemed to give my dad something else to consider rather than what has become of the rugged body that had not once betrayed him until just after he turned 75.