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Today's News

  • ANN BOND CHILTON TRAINS FOR PEACE CORPS

    50 YEARS AGO

    Thursday, Oct. 21, 1965

    Anderson County winners at the District Junior Achievement meeting in Jessamine County were, Jane Birdwhistell, red in housekeeping, photography records; Connie Herndon, blue in clothing; Mike Hostetter, blue, gardening; Steven Sparrow, blue, electric; Bobby McCoun, blue on dog care, red in Horse and pony; Allen Edmondson, blue, woodworking; Donna Crain, red on home furnishings and good grooming.

    Thursday, May 19, 1966

  • Relay for Life raises nearly $18,500 for cancer society

    Hundreds of folks made it downtown to the Lawrenceburg Green last Friday evening for Relay for Life.

    Relay for Life is a fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. Participants raise both money and awareness about cancer.

    Twenty-five teams — 90 participants — raised nearly $18,500 at the event.

    YKK Inc. Snap and Button Division was the top fundraising team with $2,700 donated. The Chamber and Auxiliary Dream Team raised $1,662, and Eli’s Superheroes banked $1,264.

  • ‘Dinner with a Doctor’ draws large crowd

    Women of all ages attended the Dinner with a Doctor “Breast and Cervical Cancer” at the Anderson County Health Department last Thursday evening.

    The event, sponsored by the health department and Frankfort Regional Medical Center in Frankfort, featured Dr. Aruna Arekapudi, a board-certified medical oncologist and hematologist.

    Arekapudi informed the crowd of 40 women about the signs and symptoms of both breast and cervical cancer.

    “I came to learn more about female cancers,” Cathy Whitehead, 53, said.

  • Duo enjoys layover here while crossing state on horseback

    If you spotted a covered carriage pulled by two Haflingers and a woman riding horseback in Anderson County last weekend, you weren’t just imagining things.

    The pair, Edith Conyers of Mount Sterling and Ginny Grulke of Lexington, are crossing Kentucky on horses and blogging about their experience.

    On Thursday, their 10-day journey brought them to Lawrenceburg, and the C-Far Farm.

    “They got to my house Thursday, rested Friday, and left again Saturday,” Jackie Nickell said.

  • Weather hinders annual Healing Field poker run

    About 20 bikers braved Saturday’s raw weather during the annual poker run to benefit the Healing Field in Lawrenceburg.

    Among them was Joe Hawker, who traveled 90 miles to participate aboard his customized Polaris Slingshot that pays tribute to each branch of the military and includes images from each war dating back to World War II.

    A veteran of the U.S. Army, Hawker served as a company clerk and selected “M.A.S.H” for his license plate. “Radar was already taken,” joked Hawker.

  • Leave well enough alone, Mr. Obama

    Column as I see ’em …

    I’ll begin this week by weighing in on Obama’s latest mandate on how school districts must obey his so-called “guidelines” on transgender bathrooms and whatnot.

    As I’ve made clear before, if these observations aren’t politically correct enough for you, too bad. I have not, and do not ever intend to be, politically corrected.

  • Unhappy plants? Give them a new home

    I pass by a lot of yards every day. I love to look at the variety. Some are well manicured and designed for ease of mowing and maintenance. Some are filled with arbors, benches and pots. Some have multiple shades of green and some offer a riot of color.

    Your yard says a lot about you. It tells how much time you spend working to keep things beautiful. Mine is a mix of what I like to call tamed and untamed cattle fields.

  • Clearance shopping will help you save

    Another question I get asked a lot is, “How do you get clothes for so cheap?” My answer, “I shop for clearance items!” I always shop the clearance rack before I even think about shopping for full price items.

    This past week was a rough week for me. But like most women, the best way to turn a frown upside down is to shop.

  • The Dept. of Education and our identity crisis
  • The dark side of black root rot

    Recent rainy weather in Kentucky has favored black root rot disease development. Black root rot can affect a wide range of ornamentals in home and commercial landscapes, nurseries, and greenhouses.

    Black root rot is commonly observed on Japanese and blue hollies, inkberry, pansy, petunia, and vinca. In addition to ornamentals, numerous vegetable and agronomic crops are susceptible.

    Black root fot facts