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Today's News

  • ‘Get the trucks outta here’

    Judge-Executive Orbrey Gritton’s message for Gov. Matt Bevin will be a simple one when he meets with him Feb. 16: temporarily ban heavy truck traffic on Alton Road (Highway 151).
    “All it would take is the stroke of a pen,” Gritton said as he prepares for the meeting that will include state Rep. James Tipton and Alton Road residents Tom Isaac and Don McCormick.

  • Lady Bearcats overcome Boyle

    Anderson County overcame a nine-point deficit to defeat host Boyle County last Monday night.

    Trailing 36-27 early in the third quarter, Anderson went on a 20-3 run, which included a spree of 11 straight points, to take control.

    According to the Danville Advocate-Messenger, Boyle had more turnovers (16) than points (15) in the second half.

  • Countdown to 500: 497 wins for Glen Drury

    The countdown to Anderson County High School boys' basketball coach Glen Drury's 500th career win stands at 497.

    Clark County made sure it was put on hold with a 92-74 win over the Bearcats Tuesday night in Winchester. A complete story on that game will appear in the Feb. 10 edition of The Anderson News.

    The Bearcats return home Friday, Feb. 5, to host Frankfort, then entertain Lincoln County the following night. Tuesday, Feb. 9, the Bearcats are scheduled to travel to Carroll County.

  • Tipton doing his part, but solution not in sight

    Column as I see ’em …
    Mind if I do a little sniping from the cheap seats about the past week’s lamentations about the state budget?
    Didn’t think so.
    While it’s clearly more complicated (or perhaps convoluted) than I’m capable of understanding from the cheap seat behind my keyboard, I’m fairly sure I can provide at least one simple explanation that might provide insight into why the budget is so out of whack.

  • Raising kids nowadays difficult for kids of ‘80s

    Being a kid of the 1980s makes it a bit more difficult to raise children born post 9/11. There are so many differences in the world that have occurred since we were children.
    One of the biggest being that, in the 80s we didn’t have cell phones. You got a quarter to call your mom from a payphone (and yes, there were payphones everywhere) to pick you up from the mall or the arcade.

  • Governor’s budget contains ‘smoke and mirrors’

    Last Tuesday, Gov. Bevin proposed his 24-month spending strategy. On the surface, his budget looks reasonable and responsible. However, once we started digging deeper, we found cuts to education, human services, and other programs Kentuckians depend upon to have long-lasting ripple effects in our communities.

  • Pro-life legislation passes House

    This week in Frankfort proved to be not only fruitful, but historic for the Kentucky House of Representatives. For the first time in more than 12 years, debate and a floor vote was allowed on a pro-life piece of legislation. Senate Bill 4, commonly known as the informed consent bill, passed the House by a vote of 92-3.

  • Daughter’s homecoming to include grits

    My daughter has been in California for the last 18 months. She’s coming home in a few weeks and has already requested cheese grits for her first breakfast at home.
    Grits are certainly not as common in California. I might try the recipe below, which is a Kentucky favorite with country ham and grits. Add some broccoli to this recipe and it ups the nutritional value.
    Sounds weird, but I think it’s delicious and I’m not a fan of country ham.

  • Recapping the 2015 beef market

    Recently, I attended the Agricultural Economic Outlook for 2016 presented by specialists in the College of Agriculture Agricultural Economics Department.
    While there, they also discussed the 2015 cattle market and offered some thoughts as to why we saw such a drastic change from spring to fall. Below is a summary of their explanation of why this occurred.
    Let’s start with the basics.

  • Lawrenceburg’s Abe may hang up his stovetop hat

    When Jim Sayre, a renowned local Abraham Lincoln impersonator, takes off his stovetop hat following his Chautauqua presentation at Anderson County High School on Feb. 12, it may be one of his final appearances.
    Sayre, who has been impersonating the 16th president of the United States for the past 33 years, said he’s not sure whether to hang up his hat for good.
    “I’m 80 years old. That decision is not firm at this time,” he added. “In the wintertime, I need something to do.”