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Today's News

  • High school teacher collaborates on classroom memorial

    It began with a rotor blade.
    Steven McKaig, technology education instructor at Anderson County High School, said his original intent wasn’t to create a memorial in his classroom.
    He had been talking with student Caleb Tiedi about their mutual interest in military aircraft, and Tiedi offered to talk to his father, who possessed a decommissioned helicopter main rotor blade from a Kiowa OH56 Army utility helicopter.

  • It’s harvest time, so spray carefully

    It’s time to put the garden into high gear. I’m guessing the canners are jiggling and freezers are filling.
    Those of us living in the country may have noticed the increase in noise outside. The insects are so loud you almost want to shush them. That’s the sign that all the bugs are out. It’s happy hour in the garden. They know that it’s prime time for good eats.
    Your plants should be loaded by now and it’s a tough time to treat for pests. There are a variety of methods to protect your food.

  • Thompson’s shallow analysis on church buildings misses point

    I wish to respond to Jess Thompson’s column from last week in which he sharply criticized nearly every local church for having buildings which he deemed excessive in their size or cost.  He described them as “mega buildings.”  By any commonly accepted definition there are no mega churches in Anderson County.  And, even if there were, that would not necessarily be a bad thing.  A mega church is given the opportunity to do mega ministry.  

  • Backpack Buddies needs community’s support

    Did you know that 47 percent or approximately 3,800 Anderson County children receive free or reduced school meals? Did you ever wonder what those children eat on the weekends?
    We do. We are Anderson County Backpack Buddies, a tax-exempt, non-profit organization that helps feed those children on the weekends.

  • County needs to take action on abandoned homes

    To the editor:
    I’m very disappointed in our county and find it hard to believe that there is a lack of legal recourse for abandoned properties like the one on Hammond Road.  
    Why do we even have the processes in place to condemn or issue orders to destroy a building because it is a fire hazard if there are no laws to enforce such orders?  

  • The myth of the slippery slope

    I don’t believe in the slippery slope.
    You know, that metaphorical downward hill of depravity everyone talks about.
    I basically put it in the same category as the bogeyman. Or unicorns.
    I consider myself a pretty respectful and responsible person. I pay my taxes. I give change to the Salvation Army at Christmastime. I refrain from taking candy from small children, or kicking cute puppies.
    Imagine my astonishment when I learn that my generation’s sliding down the slope’s shifting sands of immorality.  

  • Common sense in short supply

    Column as I see ’em …
    Here’s a thought from a reader that makes sense — that is unless the goofy rules handed down from state government are applied.
    I received an e-mail from a reader who requested anonymity but wanted to weigh in on the school district’s decision not to budget to purchase high school text books, allowing instead the school’s site based council (which has no authority to tax but in this case is doing so anyway) to ding each kid $50 as an “instructional fee.”

  • 127 yard sale starts Thursday

    The annual 127 Yard Sale, which stretches 675 miles from Hudson, Mich., to Gadsen, Ala., will draw thousands of visitors to Anderson County starting Aug. 4-7.
    Described in a news release as the world’s longest yard sale, the 127 corridor yard sale began as a means of getting drivers off the interstate and on the roadways of rural and America. The event, celebrating its 24th anniversary this year, is always held the first Thursday in August through the first Sunday, Aug. 4-7.

  • Spilled oil on US 127 slows down traffic
  • Magistrates table setting new tax rate

    Taxpayers will have to wait at least a few more days to find out if their county property tax rates will go up.
    During its meeting Tuesday morning, the Anderson County Fiscal Court voted to table setting its tax rate for 2011-12 because of confusion over exactly how much revenue it would receive.
    Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway said he had received tax rate details from Property Value Administrator Brian Stivers that came to one conclusion, and from the state’s Department of Local Government that came to another.