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Today's News

  • Band of Brothers works to send care packages to Afghanistan

    Football season is over, but the Band of Brothers, as a service organization, isn’t finished when it comes to helping out its community.
    The Band of Brothers collected garbage for five hours along five miles of US 62 on Jan. 29, receiving $100 per mile through a county grant.
    Now the group will use the $500 they earned to send care packages to U.S. soldiers serving in Afghanistan.

  • Police report drugs, speed as factors in Spencer double fatality
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  • Hangin’ at Best Western
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  • Pesticide training set at Extension

    The Anderson County Extension Service has scheduled private applicator pesticide training sessions on March 8 at 1:30 p.m., and on April 10 at 6:30 p.m.
    All sessions will be held at the Extension Office at 1026 County Park Road.
    According to the Extension’s release, “By law anyone using chemicals classified as ‘restricted use’ must have a valid private applicator certification card. The only way to keep this card current is to attend pesticide update training on proper use and handling.”

  • Historical society to meet Feb. 23

    The monthly meeting of the Anderson County historical society will be held Feb. 23 at 7 p.m. at the Anderson Public Library. This month’s speaker, George Geoghegan, will discuss “An Architectural History of Lawrenceburg.” This meeting is free and open to the public.
     

  • Support the children of military personnel April 28

    Anderson County residents include at least 70 children who are military dependents from all branches of the military.
    Frequent deployments have become a way of life in the past 10 years. Returning home is not necessarily easy for the families or military personnel.
    Community members can help military families by understanding that no one reacts the same to coming home. Rejoice together at reunions and give families time and space to re-integrate.

  • Nothing normal about this winter season

    Mark your calendars. The Heirloom Seed Workshop will be held at 10 a.m. on March 24 at the public library’s large meeting room.
    Pre-registration is required (to make sure everyone gets a chair). You can call the library at 839-6420 or stop in to register. It is a free workshop.

  • Swallowed by education’s complicated alphabet soup

    My favorite writers — journalists, poets and songwriters alike — tell it like it is.
    No careful waltzes around the truth.
    No ring-around-the-rosy games around what really matters.
    Which is why the convoluted language of education, especially the dizzyingly complicated formulas of Kentucky’s new educational assessment standards, is particularly frustrating.
    The main and justified criticism of No Child Left Behind legislation was that its standards for school improvement were unrealistic and complicated.

  • Joys of fatherhood know no boundaries

    While hiding in the hallway, I listened as the commander retold the story I told him a few hours earlier.
    It was the story of how my daughter, Hayley, had gone from aspiring college student bent on becoming a physical therapist to landing in that career field with the Air Force. The catch, though, required her to report to boot camp three days later, leaving her parents almost no time to come to grips with the fact that their middle child was leaving the nest.
    The commander knew I was listening in the hallway. Hayley didn’t have a clue.

  • Former resident engineering success for Kentucky graduates

    An engineer is not just a hard hat.
    She has to be a “doer,” someone who’s not content only working with the abstract.
    Ask biomedical engineer Elaine Duncan, a former Anderson County resident and now president and founder of Paladin Medical, Inc., a consulting firm for start-up companies producing new biomedical technologies.
    “For me, it was the innovation and the creativity,” Duncan said of her interest in the engineering field. “I wanted to make things, I wanted to create things.”