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Today's News

  • Council considers development water rates for industry

    The city council held a work session Aug. 18 to discuss establishing a temporary economic development rate for city water districts as an incentive to attract future businesses and retain current industries.
    According to city clerk Robbie Hume, the city is required to conduct a cost of service study when setting utility rates for water districts.

  • Amputation trial has emotional opening

    By Lisa King
    The Sentinel-News
    The jury trial of a man suing his surgeon for amputating his penis without his consent began Monday in the matter-of-fact manner of any other trial, but it got very personal very quickly.
    Eight women and six men seated in the jury box saw graphic photos of Phillip Seaton’s groin area after what was supposed to have been a simple circumcision performed by Dr. John Patterson at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville in 2007.

  • Autism fundraiser is Saturday

    Izzy Jennings had a wish — to give.
    Now she’ll see that wish in action during Abby’s Wish on Aug. 27, a fundraiser to find a cure for autism.
    Izzy, 9, told mom Beth Jennings that she wanted to make a donation to the Ronald McDonald House and Autism Speaks. She chose Ronald McDonald House because her family had stayed there when her younger sister Abby was born.
    Abby, 7, has Asperger’s syndrome, a high-functioning type of autism.

  • No rest for gardeners planning for next year

    Well, it’s the end of another month and fall is sneaking in on us. I know each season has the same amount of months in it, but summer sure seems to go by quicker. Like a $20 bill, once you break it, it goes fast.
    Those of us who garden big time are pretty tired by now. Unfortunately, our work is not done, and motivation is tough to find. So, let me help.

  • Where, exactly, is Anderson County’s pride?

    I went to the Kentucky State Fair on Saturday.
    Freddy Farm Bureau was sitting in that same spot on the right side of the main entrance to Freedom Hall where he has talked to kids for more than 50 years. And he still wears size 31 shoes.
    You can still get those unbelievably good boneless pork chop sandwiches, corn dogs and funnel cakes just about everywhere you look. In the West Wing, rows and rows of cattle from all over Kentucky and surrounding states were lined up, just as they have been since the current fairgrounds opened in 1956.

  • A haunting in Lawrenceburg

    Ghosts haunt downtown Lawrenceburg.
    I’m not the only one who can see them.
    They’re empty, lingering shells of the lives they once led, cut short by a death that cannot be easily be explained or understood.
    In all the places I’ve lived, I’ve never seen restaurants open so hopefully and die so quickly.
    In my quest to find the answers to downtown’s problems, including the extreme lack of restaurants on Main Street, I thought to go directly to the source — the restaurant owner.

  • Conway yet to be politically corrected

    When God was passing out guts, Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway apparently snuck back in line for a second helping.
    I’ve attended public meetings for more years than I care to recall and can’t think if a single time I’ve watched an elected official act as brazenly as Conway did during last week’s board of health meeting.

  • Annual wine festival set for Saturday at Lovers Leap

    The Lawrenceburg Rotary Club will host its annual Wine Fest on Saturday, Aug. 27 from 6 to 11 p.m. at Lovers Leap Vineyard and Winery, the club announced.
    Tickets are $10, and VIP tables are available. Event sponsorships range from $1,000 to $100.
    Call club president Adam Burton at 502-517-9090 for details or e-mail adam@adamburton.net.
    Proceeds will “go back into the community,” organizers said.
    The Conch Republic Band, billed by organizers as a “trop rock” band, will provide music.

  • Photos help police nab burglary suspect

    If the man who police say admitted robbing Sparks General Store earlier this month decides to continue his career in crime, he might want to consider a mask and a way to hide the license plates on his car.
    The Anderson County Sheriff’s Office arrested Michael Dale Harmon of Mackville, Washington County on Sunday, charging him with third-degree burglary, first-degree criminal mischief and theft by unlawful taking, according to a news release.

  • Woman still missing

    The search continued Tuesday for a missing Lawrenceburg woman, the Kentucky State Police confirmed.
    Holly Stewart, 35, has been missing since last Wednesday. She was last seen in downtown Lawrenceburg wearing a red and white striped shirt, tan pants and black boots, according to the state police.
    She has brown or auburn hair.
    The state police issued a missing person alert around 9:46 p.m. Saturday, asking for the public’s help in trying to locate Stewart.
    On Monday, Det. Kevin Calhoon said the police are still hoping to determine where she is.