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Today's News

  • ‘Glass mountain’: beautiful or dangerous?

    A meth lab burned down.
    Firefighters set the fire to practice for future blazes in the industrial park.
    Tim Hostetler, the operations manager at Dlubak Glass Co., in Lawrenceburg, has heard both rumors as the reasons behind the recycling plant’s massive fire May 3.
    He’s heard other descriptions of “glass mountain” in the past 12 years he’s worked for the Dlubak Glass Co.:
    Eyesore.
    Diamonds.
    And especially this conversation topic:
    What will happen if a tornado ripped through glass mountain?

  • Clutter a clue to life inside home
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  • Search for .22 round a living nightmare

    It was common when I was in high school for me to dig deep for milk money and pull several loose .22 rounds out of my pants pocket while sorting my change.
    The lunch lady at the cash register didn’t run away screaming and the local police department’s version of a S.W.A.T. team didn’t storm the building.
    It was a fact in our rural little town that boys (and a fair number of girls) had and used guns. Seeing them hanging from racks in the rear windows of their trucks parked outside the school building was as unremarkable as it was commonplace.

  • City council approves $3.559 million budget, salary increases

    The city council unanimously approved the second reading of its $3.559 million budget for the upcoming fiscal year, including a 1.74 percent salary increase for mayor, city council and all city employees.
    The council approved the first reading of the 2013-2014 budget during its May meeting.
    All six council members were present during Monday night’s meeting.

  • Fundraiser set for slain officer’s family

    Lawrenceburg police officer Sean Wells has organized a fundraiser to help the family of a Bardstown police officer murdered last month.
    Wells and fellow officers will wait tables Wednesday, June 19 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Edwardo’s Pizza, located on Glensboro Road, with a portion of the proceeds and all of the tips collected going to office Jason Ellis’ family.
    Ellis was ambushed and murdered May 25 while removing debris off an exit on the Bluegrass Parkway.

  • Manager: Smoke from glass fire posed no danger

    If a tornado tore through the industrial park glass pile at Dlubak Glass Co., operations manager Tim Hostetler said, it’d be a disaster.
    It’d also be a disaster if a tornado came through Lawrenceburg and picked up rocks, cars or trees, he said.
    “If a natural disaster happens, it happens,” Hostetler said. “Look at Oklahoma — you get a 2-mile wide tornado, it’s going to tear up everything.”

  • So they can rest in peace

    This house would be their home.
    But there’s one thing about it you may not like, the late Jackie Benningfield told his wife Betty Benningfield in the early ‘70s.
    Someone buried dead people in their new backyard.  
    Embraced by a 200-year-old stone fence, the Bell-Carpenter graveyard rests a few feet away from the intersection of Carlton and Maple Drive.

  • Woman’s tree swiped while she’s at church

    Joyce Sims came home from church June 2 and immediately called Lawrenceburg police.
    Someone had stolen her tree peony.  
    The tree is not her favorite planting in Sims’ meticulously landscaped backyard at 617 Nickelbie Drive. Sims prefers Crepe Myrtle trees or calla lilies to a tree peony or “peony tree” as she referred to the perennial.
    But the tree peony’s maroon-and-white flowers bloom for only a few short weeks in spring, Sims said, and then they’re gone until next year.

  • City man charged with animal cruelty

    A Lawrenceburg man is scheduled to return to court later this month after being charged with second-degree cruelty to animals, according to documents on file in Anderson District Court.
    Ronald Stella, 59, of 1125 Tara Way, has already entered a plea of not guilty and is scheduled to appear at 9 a.m. June 19 for a pre-trial conference.
    Stella is charged with shooting a neighbor’s dog, a boxer named Rocco, in an incident last September.

  • District seeks input on Anderson County High School principal selection

    The site-based decision-making council at Anderson County High School is seeking to gather as much input as possible by inviting students, parents, staff and community members to complete an online survey to provide input to the council, according to a press release.

    The survey can be accessed at www.acschools.net and will close at midnight on June 10.