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Today's News

  • Carlson’s take on home-schoolers playing public sports just wrong

    Ben Carlson is my boss, but when it comes to whether home-schooled children should be allowed to play sports on school teams, he’s just wrong.
    A week ago, Carlson penned a column asking what would it hurt if children whose parents have opted to educate their children at home instead of in a public or private school were allowed to play interscholastic sports.

  • Growing up with 9/11

    At 12, I preferred to color between the lines.
    I was probably darkening my doodled, misshapen stars in my notebook when my seventh grade teacher received the call.
    He rushed out of the room, and rushed back in to turn on the loop of a plane, a tower and a TV screen full of smoke.
    As a 12-year-old, my post-9/11 world still rotated around the typical routine: after school snacks, play rehearsal, church on Sundays.
    I couldn’t predict that my world, by 2011, would be in danger of tilting off its axis.

  • Lack of 9/11 event here a real shame

    Column as I see ’em …
    The 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks weren’t atop my mind Sunday morning as I cruised down North Main while trying to finish my weekend honey-do list.
    Why would it be? Not one public agency in Anderson County had planned a memorial service or otherwise — at least that they bothered to tell the newspaper about.

  • Like father, like son

    Aura’s not your typical high school garage band.   
    To be exact, the four Anderson County High School seniors practice in a barn.  
    Guitarist Lowell Gordon reassures the converted stall on drummer and cousin Brett Tracy’s property is a good place to work on Aura’s music.
    If they tried practicing in the same space as their fathers’ band, Garland Buckeye, they’d make a lot of alternative rock noise.  ”It’s got to be separate, with all that rock music,” Lowell said.

  • Red Hat Ladies support food drive
  • First responders, official receive cakes on 9/11

    Every year since Sept. 11, 2001, employees at Cash Express stores across Kentucky and Tennessee and throughout the nation have visited first responders in early September to deliver cakes to police and fire stations.
    This year employees from the Cash Express store on Humston Drive delivered cakes to EMS technicians at the EMS district office.
    Cake will also be delivered to police officers at Glensboro Road. Cash Express gave cakes to ambulance, police, sheriff’s department and county judge’s office.
     

  • Harry Wise residents fuming over fiscal court decision

    Residents along Harry Wise Road are speaking out after the Anderson County Fiscal Court rejected a planning and zoning recommendation to allow a new tract of homes to be built.
    The fiscal court made its decision last Tuesday morning, and asked the county attorney to draft facts and findings it will vote on at a later date.
    Developer Larry Cann asked the court to override planning and zoning’s decision and grant him a zoning change that will allow him to build up to 17 homes in a wooded lot he owns on Harry Wise Road.

  • English by birth, American by oath

    Phil Cooke had a valid green card, and could have stayed in America in perpetuity without the hassle of filling out the mountains of paperwork and other requirements to receive full citizenship.
    But the native of England said he loves living in Lawrenceburg so much, completing the tedious process was the least he could do.
    “The reason I did it was out of respect for the community,” Cooke said. “The people of Lawrenceburg and First Baptist Church right from day one made me feel welcome. I feel it really is my home.”

  • Duo indicted after alleged crime spree

    Two Lawrenceburg residents were indicted last Tuesday on numerous felony counts of burglary and theft by unlawful taking.
    Frederick Kirchhoff III, 28, and Samantha Wolverton, 27, both of 101 Brenda Drive, were indicted by the Anderson County Grand Jury on six counts of theft by unlawful taking, over $500, each a Class D felony. They were also indicted on five counts of third-degree burglary and one county first-degree burglary for an alleged crime spree earlier this year, according to the indictment on file in Anderson County Circuit Court.

  • Pool Party?

    Events in the county park, and plenty of them.
    That’s the formula Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway has put in place to someday allow Anderson County to own and operate its own public swimming facility.
    “That’s my insight; that’s my vision,” Conway said Monday. “It might not happen in next three or four years, but I can actually see it happening.”