Today's News

  • Crepps serves as House Majority Leader page
  • Four Roses’ new limited edition features 13-year-old barrel strength bourbon

    This spring, Four Roses Distillery will issue the newest release in its series of limited-quantity special bottlings with the 2013 Limited Edition Single Barrel Bourbon, which will be bottled at barrel strength and feature spicy characteristics of cinnamon, nutmeg and brown sugar, according to a press release.
    Four Roses Master Distiller Jim Rutledge personally selected a 13-year-old bourbon that uses Four Roses’ recipe coded OBSK, one of 10 uniquely handcrafted bourbon recipes produced by the Lawrenceburg-based distillery.

  • High-speed chase starts here, ends in Mercer County

    A Russell Springs man was jailed after police say he lead them on a high-speed chase Monday morning that began in Lawrenceburg and ended 40 miles away in Mercer County.
    Dallas Corey Crawford, 38, was arrested and taken to Lawrenceburg Police Department where he was transported to Shelby County Detention Center.  His charges include first-degree fleeing and evading a police officer, three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment, reckless driving, careless driving, no seat belt and other violations, according to a news release from the Kentucky State Police.

  • Patience is a virtue, even for gardeners

    Patience. I’m pretty sure that’s what we all need right now.
    It is the middle of April and while a decade into our future we may be planting at this date, climate change has not taken us there yet.
    Our typical planting date here is right around Derby day. That does not mean that you can just sit around and wait.

  • I’ve found the enemy, it’s us

    Bending paperclips calms me.
    Fragile metal contorted into shepherd’s hooks or misshapen cranes lay inert beneath computer paper shrouds.
    Their broken limbs of snapped, twisted metal litter my desk.
    They are the leftovers of trying to wield control in an uncontrollable world.
    Destroying something that can’t ever be made whole again relieves stress.  
    It always has.
    When I was a child, usually sitting in the left outfield wearing my baseball mitt as a hat, my fingers happily found grass to destroy.  

  • Lawsuit blessing in disguise for library

    The Anderson Public library’s board of trustees will apparently wait until a court orders it to comply with the statute that governs how it’s supposed to set tax rates before doing so on its own.
    And that’s a shame because by doing so the board is missing out on a great chance to reinvent its image and survive what will otherwise be a devastating financial blow.
    The order to lower its tax rate has already come for a library in northern Kentucky and, trust me on this, a similar order will eventually be issued here.

  • Bibb lettuce has strong Kentucky roots

    Kentuckians may know that Bibb lettuce was developed by Major John Bibb in the backyard of his Frankfort home — Grey Gables (Bibb-Burnley House).
    He moved to Frankfort in 1856 and shared his seeds and plants with friends. Soon it became known as Bibb lettuce and became commercially produced in 1935.
    Soon you will be able to buy Bibb lettuce at the local farmer’s markets. The Anderson County Farmer’s Market opens Friday, April 26 at noon.

  • A band of cats invaded our garage, capturing my dogged devotion

    If you had asked just more than a year ago, I’d have sworn to you I was a dyed-in-the-fur dog person.
    I proclaimed my love for all animals — dolphins, dogs, elephants, frogs — but when it came to cats, I was uninterested. Never had a cat. Didn’t understand them — or their people, really. Required a preventative dose of Benadryl to stave off my sneezes when visiting their homes.
    But a funny thing happened when I got to know a few felines who were hanging around our neighborhood.

  • Middle school student earns honorable mention during UK entomology symposium

    An Anderson County Middle School student received an honorable mention for his presentation during a University of Kentucky symposium on invasive species.
    Tanner Carlson, 12, a seventh grader, competed in a poster contest against undergraduate college students during the event, held last week in Lexington.
    Carlson’s presentation was on the emerald ash borer, which has invaded a number of counties in Kentucky, including Anderson, and kills ash trees.

  • ‘Armed and dangerous’ Anderson County man mistakenly turned loose

    Landmark News Service
    A manhunt was under way Tuesday afternoon for an Anderson County man who considered by federal marshals to be armed and dangerous but mistakenly let out the Fayette County Detention Center.
    Rodney Dewayne Bell, 28, had been jailed for a short time at the Shelby County Detention Center, after being arrested in Anderson County on drugs charges, said Tony Aldridge, a captain at the Shelby County Detention Center.
    Aldridge said that Bell had also incurred federal charges by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF).