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Today's News

  • Child-tying suspects due back in court, prepare for trial

    One of the more anticipated criminal trials in several years is scheduled to begin later this month for the three people charged with tying up a 3-year-old for up to 16 hours each day.
    The trial is scheduled for Feb. 25-27, but a pretrial conference is scheduled for Tuesday at 9 a.m. in Anderson Circuit Court.
    Charged in the case are the girl’s parents, Rebecca and Herbert Medley, along with her grandmother, Carolyn Case.

  • Auditor: City government nets $148,000 profit in 2012

    The city of Lawrenceburg received a positive “clean opinion” for its 2012 independent audit, according to Auditor Thomas Smith of Lawrenceburg accounting firm Farmer and Humble.
    Smith presented the council with his findings during the council’s meeting on Monday night, stating that there were no incidences of non-compliance for the city during the last fiscal year.
    The city even made a “net profit,” Smith said, of $148,049 in governmental funds revenue for 2012.

  • Taxing districts, retirement system among short session items

    The 2013 Regular Session of the Kentucky General Assembly is in full swing; the House of Representatives is considering several high profile topics during this short, 30-day session.

  • Closing the achievement gap, one sticky note at a time

    By Meaghan Downs
    News staff
    Waking up at 5:45 a.m. one morning last week, Instructional Supervisor Sharon Jackman wanted to check one thing on her phone.
    Anderson County test scores.
    Students just finished being tested using the Measures of Academic Progress exam or MAP, Jackman said, a test given three times a year that allows staff to track academic growth and predict performance, as best they can, on how students K-8 will score on state assessments like the Kentucky Performance Rating for Educational Progress (K-PREP) in the spring.

  • For big plants in May, get tomato seeds now

    OK, let’s get the big news out of the way first. Don’t worry, I’m still going to be here writing this column, I’m still going to open the vegetable stand from Memorial Day to Labor Day and I’m still going to be here on my wonderful farm. It’s just that I’m leaving my job at the library.

  • Try sweet potatoes for vitamin rich meals

    Sweet potatoes are one of my favorite foods. They are an excellent source of vitamins A and C.  When selecting sweet potatoes pick the small to medium size for flavor at the peak of perfection. Choose firm, dark, smooth sweet potatoes without wrinkles, bruises, sprouts or decay. Even if cut away, a decayed spot may have already caused the whole potato to take on an unpleasant flavor.

  • When faith and news collide

    This column doesn’t usually tackle religion.
    But religion found me this week in an unusual place.
    The news.
    First, the facts.
    I am a pastor’s daughter.
    As well as sister, daughter and sarcastic lackwit, I’ve also claimed the title of pastor’s daughter for almost a decade now.
    Therefore, I know a little bit (not a lot mind you) about how the religious sausage is made.
    And everyone has an opinion about religion. Including pastor’s daughters.

  • Three politicians who shouldn’t be re-elected

    Column as I see ’em …
    We Kentuckians have been a fairly pious bunch in recent weeks, flaunting our frontiersmen and women attitudes as America’s most populated cities and states wage war against the 2nd Amendment.
    We snicker at New Yorkers and their goofy new gun laws, and mock Chicago as a perfect example of what happens when politicians strip away the rights of law-abiding citizens to defend themselves against gun-toting thugs.

  • Magistrates start process to do away with business, booze licenses

    Those thinking about purchasing a county business license might want to hold off a few weeks.
    During its meeting last Tuesday, the Anderson County Fiscal Court took the first step in eliminating that license and others to become what Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway calls more “business friendly.”
    Magistrates unanimously approved a motion to have County Attorney Bobbi Jo Lewis draft an ordinance that would take off the books a license based on the number of people a business employs, as well as one required for stores that sell beer and liquor.

  • Trashed Lock Road property draws ire of fiscal court

    A pile of junk and trash on Lock Road remains untouched a full year after the property’s owner was put on notice that it had to be cleaned up.
    Frustrated with the lack of progress, the Anderson County Fiscal Court debated last Tuesday using county equipment to cleaning it up and placing a lien on the property, which is owned by Robin Sims of 100 Quachita Trail, Frankfort.