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Today's News

  • Lego Legends take second, qualify for national competition

    The Lego Legends, a 4-H Lego robotics team comprised of 10 students ages 9-14 from Franklin, Anderson and Mercer counties, recently returned home with second highest honors from the Kentucky state First Lego League tournament. The tournament was held on the campus of Western Kentucky University on Jan. 14 and included 44 other qualifying teams.

  • District court docket: 1-30-12

    Judge Donna Dutton heard the following cases during Anderson District Court proceedings on DeC. 22, 2011.
    Timothy Chamberlin, disposition, second-degree disorderly conduct – deferred six months, review Aug. 2.
    Jesse Curran, arraignment, two counts of theft by deception (less than $500) – show cause Jan. 5.

  • Glensboro Road woman, 64, indicted for cocaine, assault

    A Lawrenceburg woman was indicted Jan. 10 on a felony charge for cocaine possession, drug-related misdemeanor charges and a misdemeanor assault charge.
    Sharon Burdick, 64, of 1663 Glensboro Road was indicted by the Anderson County Grand Jury for first-degree cocaine possession, a Class D felony.
    She was also indicted for illegal use or possession of drug paraphernalia; illegal possession of marijuana; second-degree possession of hydrocodone; and possession of controlled substances not in original container.

  • Prescription drug abuse was far from over

    We know bath salts and synthetic marijuana are quickly becoming a problem in Anderson County.
    But what about prescription pills?
    We’ve heard about the “pill mills” in Florida and Georgia, and the unflattering “pillbillies” nickname given to Kentuckians who travel across state lines as pain clinic customers.
    It’s not a new topic, not in the slightest.
    That’s the problem.
    Prescription drugs involve a danger unlike bath salts and synthetic marijuana: recommended human consumption.

  • Lawsuit spells trouble for Anderson library

    It appears the Anderson Public Library has for decades been taxing the public in violation of state law, and the ramifications for doing so could be tremendous.
    A mighty bold statement? You bet, but the facts don’t lie.
    We’ll explain why, but first a little background. The library is funded through what’s called a special taxing district, meaning it appears on your county property tax bill as a separate line item.
    Each year, the boards that oversee the health department and library create budgets and set a tax rate on your property.

  • BYOT: Bring your own technology

    Students in Anderson County Schools are trading their No. 2 pencils for personal iPads and e-readers in an effort to further integrate technology into district curriculum and classrooms.
    Bret Foster, chief information officer, said about 59 percent of Kentucky school districts offer a “bring your own device” policy, but few have implemented it on Anderson County’s scale.  
    As frontrunners in this endeavor, Foster said, the district starting providing a proxy online network in September 2011 for all grades kindergarten through 12th.  

  • A downtown fixture

    Jim Hyatt didn’t grow up thinking he would own Lawrenceburg’s only pool room.
    More than 40 years later, he couldn’t imagine doing anything else.
    Hyatt, the 76-year-old proprietor of Jim’s Pool Room on Main Street, has been slinging hamburgers and coney dogs while chatting up neighbors and fellow University of Kentucky fans for decades.
    “I should retire, but I’ve been doing it so long,” he said, standing behind the pool room’s well-worn wooden bar. “I like doing it.”

  • Coming Wednesday: General Cable struts its stuff
  • New ECC building too small

    The Ezra B. Sparrow Early Childhood Center will be completed by next school year, offering new technology and a new building, but not enough square feet.
    According to Superintendent Sheila Mitchell, some early childhood programs or classrooms at the current ECC will need to relocate to individual district elementary schools next school year due to lack of space at the newly constructed center.

  • Foreclosure forecast is gloomy

    First, the good news. Home foreclosures in Anderson County dropped to their lowest level in several years in 2011.
    Now, the bad news. It appears that the decline was artificial, and 2012 could be worse than ever.
    Foreclosures, which have topped 100 each of the past three years, dipped to 63 in 2011, according to Bill Patrick, a Lawrenceburg attorney who oversees foreclosures as the county’s master commissioner.