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Today's News

  • Pierian Woman’s Club plans activities for coming year

    From staff reports
    The Lawrenceburg Pierian Woman’s Club resumed its monthly meetings Sept. 15, and welcomed new members Beth Schwarz and Amy Stumph.
    Singer-pianist Jim Wheeler provided musical entertainment.
    Frank Rowe gave a talk about Habitat for Humanity. A nonprofit, nondenominational Christian housing ministry, Habitat provides housing for low-income working families. Through volunteer labor and donations of money and materials, Habitat builds and rehabilitates simple houses, according to a news release.

  • Flags hoisted at sheriff’s office
  • Local politicians visit Anderson County Public Schools
  • Wednesday sports update: Bearcat soccer beats Marion

    Wednesday sports update

     

    Not a lot to report on from Anderson County sports on Tuesday night, however, the Anderson County boys’ soccer team routed Marion County, 3-0.  Details will be in the Sept. 28 Anderson News.

    The big game tonight is Anderson County vs. Franklin County in girls’ soccer action.  It is a district seeding game to be played at the Anderson pitch at 7 p.m.

  • VFW, Auxiliary sponsor scholarship contests for youth

    The Veterans of Foreign Wars, Post 4075, and the Ladies Auxiliary are sponsoring two contests for youth in the community.
    The “Voice of Democracy Scholarship Competition” is open to students in grades 9-12. It is a three to five minute audio-essay on the subject, “Is There Pride in Serving in our Military?”. First and second place winners will receive $500 and $250, respectively, and be eligible for district, state and national scholarships.

  • Make sure to scrub garden delights

    T-Shirts and sweatshirts … it’s that kind of weather.
    Fall officially arrives this Friday, bringing both the good and the bad.
    Those who dislike hot weather, love it. The rest of us, not so much.
    Like spring, fall is a roller coaster of weather fronts, bouncing us back and forth between hot and cold, sunny and rainy and breezes and gales. We can be in T-shirts and sandals one day and bundling up the next.

  • Questions, answers as election day nears

    Although the General Election is still 48 days away, we have been receiving numerous questions, so I thought we would get an early start and answer them in this month’s column.
    Question: When is the General Election and who is running for what?  
    Answer: Nov. 8 is the date. This year’s rlection is for statewide races, which include governor, secretary of state, agriculture commissioner, state auditor, state treasurer and attorney general.
    A complete list of candidates can be seen on the Secretary of State’s website at www.elect.ky.gov.

  • ACT scores symptom of public school ills

    This year Anderson County High School juniors took the ACT test. This is the third year that the scores have been consistently leveling out at 18.3, which is below the national average of 21.1, and the state composite scores of 18.8.
    Other counties have scored higher than Anderson. Some of those are Franklin at 19, Spencer at 18.7, and Shelby at 18.7.

  • Adventures in aloneness

    I linger now where I used to fear to tread — being alone.
    Stepping out into the world by myself, even for a moment, can  be a dangerous endeavor.
    They say we’re born into the world alone, and in the same way, we die alone.
    But no one talks about the in between, or how we’re supposed to be alone in the midst of living.
    My solo forays into the social wild are fleeting. You could even say they’re not risky at all.
    A trip to the grocery store. The movies. A nice restaurant.

  • Failing grade for Kentucky Utilities

    We’ll give credit to Kentucky Utilities for owning up to the problem with its contracted meter reader (see A1), but the credit stops there.
    At a minimum, the thousands of people affected by this ridiculous foul-up should have received some sort of warning from the company, along with a letter in their September bills that spelled out their payment options.
    What they received, though, were incredibly high electric bills with no explanation of why they went up so much, or what customers could do about it.