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Today's News

  • A chance to meet living history

    Ella Belle Overstreet Baxter graciously welcomed me into her home.
    But what she didn’t know what was that I wanted her secret to long life.
    Saving that, her portal to the past.
    Ella has watched Anderson County evolve for about 100 years.
    She’s been alive for both World Wars, minor and major military conflicts abroad.
    She watched distilleries flourish, then wilt; lacking liquid courage they needed during the years of Prohibition.
    The clicks of Morse Code transformed into the pings of incoming text messages.

  • Censorship a slippery slope for health board

    Column as I see ’em …
    Shut up.
    Those two words together can be rather offensive, can’t they? They become even more so when those in authority decide not only if we’re allowed to speak, but limit what we’re allowed to even say.

  • Historical Society to discuss unified government Oct. 27

    The Anderson County Historical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. on Oct. 27 at the Anderson Public Library.
    This month’s speaker, local attorney and community leader Walter Patrick, will discuss the concept and advantages of combined city and county government.
    The meeting is free and open to the public.

  • City, county get together to talk trash

    The word “mandatory” upsets people, said Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway.
    He doesn’t like it himself.
    “I hate that word mandatory,” Conway said. “I can’t stand it, I wish there was a more favorable word than mandatory.”
    Mandatory trash pickup, however, could lead to Anderson County being designated as a Certified Clean County, a title that would reap grant funds for the county.
    It’s good for the county, Conway said. But he said he’s not sure how to implement it.

  • Chamber members talk Turkey
  • Hurley keeps job, for now

    Embattled health director Brandon Hurley still has his job, but his fate is far from decided.
    The Anderson County Board of Health took no action following an hour-long closed session last Wednesday night and will no seek “legal advice” on how to proceed.
    Following the meeting, the board announced it will meet Thursday, Nov. 3 at 6:30 p.m. to discuss “personnel.”

  • Former Miss America to help honor veterans

    What could be better than a free plate of spaghetti and a chance to see and hear the delightful Heather French Henry all in one setting?
    That’s what Anderson County’s veterans have to look forward to Nov. 10 during an event sponsored by Hospice of the Bluegrass and the Anderson Senior Citizen Center.
    Henry, a Maysville native who in 1999 became the first Kentuckian to win the title of Miss America, will be the keynote speaker during the event and will encourage veterans to access the care and assistance they need.

  • Hunter hits gas instead of brake, sinks car in Taylorsville Lake

    A Jeffersontown man emerged Saturday from Taylorsville Lake safe and sound.
    His car? Not so much.
    Ronald Berkley was attempting to launch his boat that morning at the Van Buren boat ramp when things went terribly wrong, thanks to a new pair of hunting boots.
    Berkley, who was planning to boat to a location on the lake to go turkey hunting, told rescuers that he had just purchased the boots and was wearing them while backing his car down the ramp.
    “They were heavier then he was used to,” said Anderson County Fire Chief Mike Barnes.

  • Halloween hours set; trunk-or-treat events planned

    The city of Lawrenceburg will host its annual trunk-or-treat on the Green on Oct. 31 from 5:30-7 p.m.
    Official trick-or-treat hours for the city are 5:30-7:30 p.m.
    The sheriff’s office will host its own trunk-or-treat event, “Project Safe Street” on Oct. 31 at 5 p.m. on the courthouse lawn. The event will feature free glow sticks and reflective trick-or-treat bags.
    Sand Spring Baptist Church will host a trunk-or-treat on Oct. 31 at 6:30 p.m.
    Other community organizations will be hosting trunk-or-treat prior to Halloween:

  • Stunning details revealed in charges against former social worker Murphy

    The former Anderson County social worker indicted on nine felony counts of tampering with public records admitted doing so to an investigator with the attorney general’s office, according to documents obtained by The Anderson News.
    Margaret “Geri” Murphy, who in September pleaded not guilty to the charges, admitted falsifying records in each of the nine counts, including cases involving numerous cases of alleged sexual abuse — one involving an infant.