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Today's News

  • Anderson County Habitat for Humanity dedicates recently completed home

    The Anderson County Habitat for Humanity recently dedicated a home for a Lawrenceburg family, the 14th house it has completed.
    The first house, built by Habitat for Humanity nearly 20 years ago, will soon be paid for, according to a news release from Habitat for Humanity.
    A family has been chosen for the 2014 Habitat for Humanity house.
    “Many thanks for all the people who have worked to make safe and comfortable houses for our recipients,” volunteers said in a release.
     

  • Whitehead rebuilds church playground for Eagle Scout project

    Matthew Whitehead, a 16-year-old junior at Anderson County High School, recently completed his Eagle Scout leadership service project — rebuilding a playground and installing picnic tables at First Christian Church — on Oct. 26-27.
    With the help of Boy Scout Troop 37, Whitehead worked for two days excavating the ground, digging post holes, installing picket fences, carrying 9-foot picnic tables and laying down 20,000 pounds of rubber mulch, according to his mother, Cathy.

  • Free health care? Not exactly

    By Molly Burchett
    Kentucky Health News Service
    Millions of Americans who don’t quite qualify for Medicaid could still get free health insurance through federal subsidies, but this free coverage hasn’t gotten much attention, since most of the zero premium plans come with some trade-offs.

  • Former Post 34 commander honored

    The American Legion Post 34 held its annual membership dinner Oct. 25. Commander Bill Sloan welcomed everyone and asked 1st Vice Bobby Thornberry to come forward. Bobby was honored with an Air Force rocking chair for the work he had done during his years as Post 34 Commander.
    State Rep. Kim King presented him with a Citation of Appreciation from the House of Representatives, which mentioned many of Thornberry’s accomplishments during his years as Post 34 commander.

  • News briefs: 11-6-13

    Troop 37 plans rummage sale
    Boy Scout Troop 37 will hold a rummage sale Saturday, Nov. 9, from 7a.m. to 1 p.m., at First Christian Church, 300 S. Main St., Lawrenceburg.
    “Now is the time to rid your garage or basement of some of those items that you know you’re likely not going to use again, but may be exactly what someone else needs,” organizers said.

  • Prepare now for college education

    College applications will be due soon for early decision/acceptance notification.
    Thanksgiving was always the target deadline in my household. Family gatherings during the holidays are also times when the relatives ask high school seniors what they plan to do after graduation.
    College isn’t the only answer for high school students. It may not be the best fit for some students and may be more expensive than justified for the student’s career path.

  • Apples are antidote to daylight loss

    Daylight’s a burnin’. Yes, I know that’s grammatically incorrect, but it’s what my family has said for years.
    My father, Jack, liked to say it to get us kids motivated. The saying is especially poignant this time of year. We just lost a whole hour. Well, not yet, but we’re headed in that direction.

  • Turner first grade students offer news fit to print

    First graders are champions of the non sequitur.
    They’ve perfected the art of the artless transition. One minute, you could be asking them what they think the tools of being a reporter are.
    The next, they’re describing the most efficient and safest way to enter a burning building.
    Since I cover education for The Anderson News, I’m in and out of schools fairly often, but unfortunately, I don’t often spend unlimited time with students.

  • Harold Todd is no Tea Party whack-job

    Column as I see ’em ...
    Lawrenceburg’s Harold Todd might light a candle before the altar of Tea Party darling Sen. Ted Cruz each night before going to bed, but I doubt it.
    Yet a column by Al Smith in Sunday’s edition of the Lexington “Herald-Leader” would lead readers to believe that anyone associated with the lawsuits against several Kentucky libraries is a Cruz-loving Tea Partier bent on wreaking havoc on America — or at least Kentucky’s stable of authors.

  • Sea offers thoughts, enters race for 6th District magistrate

    One of the 6th Magisterial District’s strongest advocates is now aiming to represent it on the Anderson County Fiscal Court.
    Steve Sea, 60, said last week that he intends to file papers to run for the office Wednesday (today), the first day candidates for the 2014 general election can file for office.
    Kenny Barnett, a fellow Democrat elected in 2010 when then-incumbent John Wayne Conway was elected judge-executive, currently holds the seat and as of Tuesday morning had not announced his intentions to seek re-election.