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Today's News

  • Support the children of military personnel April 28

    Anderson County residents include at least 70 children who are military dependents from all branches of the military.
    Frequent deployments have become a way of life in the past 10 years. Returning home is not necessarily easy for the families or military personnel.
    Community members can help military families by understanding that no one reacts the same to coming home. Rejoice together at reunions and give families time and space to re-integrate.

  • Nothing normal about this winter season

    Mark your calendars. The Heirloom Seed Workshop will be held at 10 a.m. on March 24 at the public library’s large meeting room.
    Pre-registration is required (to make sure everyone gets a chair). You can call the library at 839-6420 or stop in to register. It is a free workshop.

  • Swallowed by education’s complicated alphabet soup

    My favorite writers — journalists, poets and songwriters alike — tell it like it is.
    No careful waltzes around the truth.
    No ring-around-the-rosy games around what really matters.
    Which is why the convoluted language of education, especially the dizzyingly complicated formulas of Kentucky’s new educational assessment standards, is particularly frustrating.
    The main and justified criticism of No Child Left Behind legislation was that its standards for school improvement were unrealistic and complicated.

  • Joys of fatherhood know no boundaries

    While hiding in the hallway, I listened as the commander retold the story I told him a few hours earlier.
    It was the story of how my daughter, Hayley, had gone from aspiring college student bent on becoming a physical therapist to landing in that career field with the Air Force. The catch, though, required her to report to boot camp three days later, leaving her parents almost no time to come to grips with the fact that their middle child was leaving the nest.
    The commander knew I was listening in the hallway. Hayley didn’t have a clue.

  • Former resident engineering success for Kentucky graduates

    An engineer is not just a hard hat.
    She has to be a “doer,” someone who’s not content only working with the abstract.
    Ask biomedical engineer Elaine Duncan, a former Anderson County resident and now president and founder of Paladin Medical, Inc., a consulting firm for start-up companies producing new biomedical technologies.
    “For me, it was the innovation and the creativity,” Duncan said of her interest in the engineering field. “I wanted to make things, I wanted to create things.”

  • Anderson residents share passion for outreach ministry

    The Forgotten homeless ministry team travels twice a week to Louisville to listen.
    They listen to Steve, spending his retirement years in a homeless camp.
    They hear Ronnie’s story, a man who started rolling joints for his aunt and uncle when he was 5.
    “We want to hear it,” Charlie Blacketer, a Lawrenceburg resident and one of the original members of the outreach ministry, said. “We want to hear their stories.”
    Getting people off the streets isn’t the ultimate mission of The Forgotten.

  • Health board puts budget, personnel cuts on hold

    It’s back to the drawing board for the health department after board members failed to approve nearly $190,000 in spending and workforce cuts.  
    The health board decided to table its finance committee’s proposed cost-savings and reduction in workforce plans after spending an hour and a half in closed session at the board’s Feb. 15 meeting.

  • Indicted: Police nab seven in cocaine, narcotics roundup

    The Anderson County Sheriff’s Office has arrested the following people on indictment warrants stemming from multiple investigations into the trafficking of crack cocaine and prescription narcotics in Anderson County.
    More indictments and arrests are pending, the sheriff’s office reported. 
    Tristan Lee Bean, 22, of 322 Lincoln St., Lawrenceburg was indicted and arrested on one count of first-degree trafficking of crack cocaine.

  • Wright vows to fix health department

    Tim Wright’s first official act as interim public health director was to turn off the lights.
    Namely, the outdoor safety lights that could help save money when it comes to the health department’s $900 a month electric bill.
    It’s small savings, Wright said, but the beginning of his plan to improve the public’s perception of the health department, and strengthen the department’s relationship with the Anderson County community.

  • Herbal store owner busted for synthetic pot

    Enforcement of the county’s fake pot ban resulted in a real misdemeanor charge for one Anderson County business owner.
    Craig Vaughn, 30, owner of the Herbal Awakening store located on US 127, was charged Feb. 17 with alleged trafficking in a substance banned by a county ordinance, and could face other potential charges, Lawrenceburg city officer Josh Satterly said.