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Today's News

  • Buckle up, Bearcats
  • Don’t let excessive rain ruin your garden

    Whoever thought white floors were a good idea?
    People with maids, maybe. One thing is for sure, spring weather in Kentucky is never boring. You know, if we were smart, we’d dig holes to store all this water for later use this summer, but it’s too wet to dig.
    Lawns look like hay fields, ready to bale and rubber boots are everywhere.

  • Looking for legal advice in wrong place

    Column as I see ’em …
    The next time the Anderson County Board of Health wants legal assistance from the county attorney, she should tell it to go pound sand.
    A strong response, yes, but understandable given the way the health director spent over $60,000 on new furniture for the new health department building without so much as soliciting a bid.

  • Tough questions, tougher answers

    If those attending last Thursday’s inaugural community forum expected local officials to receive softball questions from the crowd, they were wrong.
    In front of nearly 100 residents, the mayor, judge-executive, school superintendent, EDA chairman and state representative fielded tough, pre-submitted questions ranging from merging city and county governments to fallout from the recent sexual harassment lawsuit against the fiscal court.

  • Saving more than souls

    Preachers are in the business of saving souls, but when Benson Creek spilled its banks Monday morning, Preacher Josh Rucker busied himself with saving a man’s truck.
    Rucker, who lives on Benson Creek Road and formerly served at Mount Vernon Baptist in Waddy, used a jon boat, heavy chain and his own pickup to pull the man’s truck from the swollen creek.
    Turns out Rucker wasn’t the only man of the cloth involved. The man who owns the truck is Minister Gene Chapman of Church of God in Lawrenceburg.

  • Rain, rain go away
  • Birthday girl’s wish comes true

    She huffed and puffed and huffed a little more, but in the end 81 candles were no match for Edith Phillips.
    Phillips, a spry and feisty 81-year-old who has spent her entire life in Anderson County, was the star attraction Monday morning at the Senior Citizen Center as a couple dozen friends and well-wishers threw her a party to celebrate her 81st birthday.
    Little did she know that a wish she asked for a week earlier would come true — that she would have a chance to blow out every candle on her cake.

  • Thirteen teaching jobs slashed

    Shrinking student populations and dwindling money with which to pay them are among the reasons that the Anderson County School District will employ 13 less teachers when the upcoming school year begins.
    Superintendent Sheila Mitchell confirmed the cuts Monday morning, saying she is left with no choice but to cut staff.
    “Our staff and administrators have worked hard to save as many jobs as possible,” Mitchell said. “I wish I had other choices than having to make reductions. It’s just something I have to do this year.”

  • COLUMN: Remember where you were Sept. 15?

    Of course you remember where you were on Sept. 11, 2001.


    You’ll never forget. You can’t erase the memories of seeing planes fly into the World Trade Center. Nor can anyone expunge the memory of seeing the most visible symbols of American economic might buckle, tilt slightly, then seeing all 110 stories come tumbling down.


    Nearly 3,000 lives were snuffed out that day.

  • TENNIS: On the road again, and again

    Imagine having a basketball team making its strongest showing in years only to lose its playing floor a few weeks before March Madness.

    Or how about a baseball team only being able to use the batting cage in the weeks leading up to the post-season?

    If you can comprehend a team dealing with those hypothetical scenarios, then you have a notion of what the Anderson County High School tennis teams are dealing with as regional tournament play begins on May 16.