Today's News

  • Emma B. Ward Elementary January students of the month
  • Waiting for white smoke

    Instead of the pope, think of a grandfather.
    Which is how the Rev. Chris Clay of St. Lawrence Catholic Church said he reacted to news of Pope Benedict XVI’s unexpected resignation.
    “I was very surprised, I was actually very emotional about it,” Clay, who learned about the resignation in an e-mail from the diocese, said. “I think was overcome with what he was doing, how almost unprecedented.”

  • Academy students move on to region science fair

    Christian Academy of Lawrenceburg science fair students will be advancing to the regional round in Louisville, according to a release from the school. By being the top finishers in the Christian Academy of Lawrenceburg Science Fair, these students qualified for the ACSI regional round to held in March at Portland Christian Academy in Louisville.

  • ACE offers March classes

    The following classes are being offered by Anderson Community Education.

    Lego robotics workshop
    When: Saturday, March 2 from 1-4 p.m. (Children 6-9 years old)
    Where: Anderson Middle School multipurpose room instruction by the 4-H Lego Legends Robotics Team
    Cost: $20 (snack will be provided to the students)

  • Library’s coffers grow despite lower tax rates

    Auditors reviewing the Anderson Public Library’s finances from last fiscal year have given the library a clean audit for 2012, according to Library Director Pam Mullins.
    Library board trustees discussed the 2012 independent audit last Tuesday, unanimously choosing to table an approval of the audit until the board’s March meeting to read it more closely.
    “I think it’d be a wise choice, just to look over it,” current library board president Bryan Proctor said during the meeting.

  • Recycling building bids meet fiscal court’s budget

    It appears the fiscal court will build a new recycling building after all.
    All but one of the six bids that were opened during last Tuesday night’s fiscal court meeting were at or below the amount the fiscal court has approved to spend on the building.
    A previous bidding process for a larger building came in at least twice as much as was budgeted, leaving the project in limbo as the court searched for ways to downgrade the building and save labor costs.

  • Sheriff may take over business licenses

    Fresh off news that its plans to do away with business license would also end its lucrative insurance premium tax, the fiscal court is now considering turning enforcement and collection over to the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office.
    That would be a dramatic switch from the way those licenses are handled now, which includes enforcement by the county’s code enforcement officer and collection by the county clerk’s office.

  • High school issues ‘soft lockdown’ after man flees Mercer cops

    Anderson County High School was under a “soft lockdown” for much of last Wednesday while local law enforcement searched for a man who fled from Mercer County authorities.
    Superintendent Sheila Mitchell said Wednesday morning that the district had a safety concern about an individual with possible connections to the high school, and that there was a probability the man would approach the high school campus.
    The “soft lockdown” involved increased security in the high school entryway and hallways as students transitioned from class to class.

  • Meatballs horse, of course

    No one likes liars.
    Particularly when your food is lying.
    Not laying on your plate, but masquerading as something it’s not supposed to be.
    Horse meat in beef’s clothing, for example.
    Imitation may be the finest form of flattery, but except when we’re not aware of the cuisine mimicry.  
    In earth-shattering headlines, media outlets pick up on the latest click-bait “you won’t believe what thing you won’t want to eat next!” and reveal another food isn’t what it said it was.

  • Business licenses, insurance fees equal death by 1,000 taxes

    Column as I see ’em …
    It was disappointing to learn that the fiscal court won’t do away with its ridiculous business license requirement simply because it includes an equally ridiculous insurance premium fee.
    Frankly, magistrates should get rid of both.
    The first is an inexplicable tax on local businesses put in place, apparently, because some people have the audacity to open a business in our fair town. The second is equally inexplicable and in place simply because people own things they either want or are required to insure.