Today's News

  • Turner third graders sing about ‘Heroes’
  • Robert B. Turner hosts art fair

    Robert B. Turner Elementary students in first through fifth grade hosted an art fair on March 29.
    Art teacher Tracey Birdwhistell said students worked on pieces for 2-3 weeks before they were ready to be displayed. “I like it because it makes them feel like a professional, like an artist,” Birdwhistell said.
    With the help of company Kids Art Fairs, students had artworks framed and ready to be sold to friends and family. The school received a portion of the proceeds from the sale of the students’ artwork, Birdwhistell said.

  • ACE offers spring classes

    Call Jacque Zeller at 839-3754 or e-mail jacque.zeller@anderson.kyschools.us to register for ACE classes.  
    Those interested can see a full listing of ACE services by going to the Anderson County Schools District website www.anderson.k12.ky.us and under Schools click on Anderson Community Education.  
    ACE is located at 219 E. Woodford St. in Lawrenceburg.

    Japanese Maples
    When: Tuesday, April 10 at 7 p. m.
    Where: Anderson Public Library with instructor Jeff Sauer
    Cost: Free

  • Christian Academy students learn about electrifying energy
  • Emma B. Ward Percussion Pals play for Board of Education
  • News briefs: 4-4-12

    Ruritans plan fish fry
    The Mount Eden Ruritan Club will host its annual fish fry April 6 from 5 to 8 p.m., the club announced.
    The meal will include fish, coleslaw, baked beans, potato wedges, drink and dessert.
    For more information, call 502-376-4291.

    Blood drive set for April 10
    The Kentucky Blood Center will host a blood drive Tuesday, April 10 from 12:30 to 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church in Lawrenceburg, the organization announced.

  • Health department offers free radon test kits

    Testing a home for deadly radon is simple — and free.
    The Anderson County Health Department is offering free radon test kits, according to a news release.
    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas released in rock, soil and water from the natural decay of uranium, according to health department nurse April Thomas.
    While levels in outdoor air pose a relatively low threat to human health, radon can accumulate to dangerous levels inside buildings.

  • Good Friday is a great day to start potato plants

    I’ve discovered one down side to the mild winter. I didn’t get much of a workout and neither did the dogs.
    I got into “full garden mode” a couple of weeks ago and Spanky and Tiller joined in to help. Keep in mind that most everything is done by hand with a lot of swinging and digging and trips up the hill.
    The dogs follow my every step, with the exception of a rabbit run or two, and I take a lot of steps. Do you know that those fur balls had the nerve to sleep in the next day!

  • Be aware of warning signs of depression

    Depression affects older adults more than most people realize.
    Extension Homemakers in Anderson County and throughout the Fort Harrod area have been learning about depression.  
    The goal of the program is three fold:  
    Recognize signs of clinical depression and seek treatment.
    Reduce the stigma associated with having depression.
    Provide support for loved ones who experience depression.

  • Plug in, tweet and be heard

    Can you tell me how we can improve Anderson County in 140 characters or less?
    Now you can.
    Some authors wrote entire novels based on exposure on Twitter.
    Others, like the president, have even held town hall meetings by responding to questions via tweet.
    The Anderson News isn’t looking to write the next Great American novel, or throw a hat into the presidential ring.
    We’re simply offering another chance for readers to become an integral part of the news making process — a few hashtags and sentences at a time.