.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Hemp law makes headway

    Hemp production in Kentucky may soon become more than a pipe dream.
    Back in November 2011, I wrote a column about industrial hemp as a source of biofuel.
    Now in 2013, industrial hemp is fueling conversations from the state senate to FFA debates at Anderson County High School.
    Last Monday the state senate passed Senate Bill 50 to allow the licensing and of hemp growers, should the state eventually receive a waiver from the federal government to produce industrial hemp.

  • Reverse foolish federal policy on industrial hemp

    Count me among those who wish the federal government would for once listen to Sen. Rand Paul and lift its ridiculous prohibition on industrial hemp.
    Count, too, our sheriff and judge-executive, both of whom have climbed on the hemp bandwagon based on the opportunities it provides for jobs and industry.
    All of Kentucky is buzzing on hemp, although not the way you might think. Unlike its ugly sister marijuana, hemp is the none-dopey version of the plant that can be used for everything from shingles to clothing to oil, plus it doesn’t get people stoned.

  • UK does more than create college grads

    Earlier this month I visited the Merchandising, Apparel and Textile Department at the University of Kentucky. The purpose of the visit was professional development including an update on current research. I thought you would be interested in the variety of research projects and relevance to Kentucky residents.

  • Feed appetite for gardening cravings online

    You know how it is when you walk into a kitchen and smell something wonderful cooking? Your mouth immediately starts to water. That’s kind of how I am when my little sprouts start to peek out of the soil. I want more! To satisfy that craving, I go online.

  • Put taxing districts under control of fiscal courts

    I moved to Kentucky in 2008 when the economy crashed. Our family decided that it was time for us to live by a budget in order to avoid our own fiscal cliff.
    Each of us puts our receipts into a jar. At the end of the month, we painstakingly open the lid and review each receipt to match our credit card statements, and to see how we are doing in meeting our budgeted expenses.
    By careful examination, we discovered unauthorized charges. We also realized that certain months we had to spend less in order to stay within our budget.

  • A sports lesson the news media should learn

    That one little piece of journalistic advice offered on a hot August morning nearly 28 years ago is still the one that drives my career as a sports journalist.
    I was attending my first University of Kentucky Football Media Day gathering at Commonwealth Stadium. Looking for a chance to be known as a hot-shot writer, I made my way over to the best in the business: Cawood Ledford.

  • Rice receives service award in NYC ceremony

    Pam Rice, vice president of Anderson County American Legion Auxiliary Unit 34, recently received a 2013 Lewis Hine Award for Service to Children and Youth in awards presentation held in New York City.
    Rice was honored by the National Child Labor Committee’s award on Jan. 28 for her social activism for the Anderson County American Legion Auxiliary Unit 34, addressing the needs of military children and families and for promoting veterans awareness, according to the press release.

  • Zoners want opt out for historic district residents

    The Planning and Zoning Commission said yes to creating a historic district in the city of Lawrenceburg.
    With one notable and additional recommendation: the inclusion of a zoning category with an “opt out” provision for property owners.
    The commission voted unanimously last Tuesday night to recommend the establishment of a historic district in the city, but with a condition for the council to consider creating a zoning category to give an option to property owners who do not want to be in the historic district.

  • A ‘Lassie’ story with a twist

    Zeke knew he had to save his partner-in-crime, Snickers.
    Trapped in a cold cistern on Hawthorne Lane with no way out, Snickers needed help.
    And Zeke, a large Labrador mix, went to find it.
    “It’s a Lassie story,” Snickers’ owner Millie McAnly said, remembering the Jan. 22 incident.
    Much like the famous collie’s television rescues, Zeke attempted to attract the attention of a property owner on Hawthorne Lane, according to Anderson County animal control officers.

  • Child-tying suspects want change of venue for trial

    Saying that he’s concerned about the amount of publicity the case has received, the attorney for one of the three people charged with tying up a 3-year-old girl for up to 16 hours each day requested their pending trial be moved out of Anderson County.
    Public defender Scott Getsinger filed a motion for a change of venue Tuesday morning in court. He told Circuit Judge Charles Hickman that he is concerned about a fair trial.