Today's News

  • Judge tosses out redistricting; King remains ‘optimistic’

    State Rep. Kim King’s hopes of being able to run for re-election here and in Mercer and Spencer counties took another leap forward late Tuesday afternoon when a Franklin Circuit Judge tossed out controversial House Bill 1.
    That bill, passed earlier this year and signed into law by Gov. Steve Beshear, would have pushed King out of Anderson County because it divided her home county of Mercer.
    In his ruling, Judge Phillip Shepherd ordered that the filing deadline for House and Senate be extended once again, this time until Feb. 10.

  • Anderson County Fire Department holds awards banquet
  • Shocking realities of prescription abuse drives summit to fight

    By Tara Kaprowy
    Kentucky Health News
    Prescription drug abuse has become so prevalent in parts of Kentucky, people are buying Mason jars of clean urine at flea markets and under the table at tobacco stores so they can pass drug tests.
    Almost two-thirds of Kentuckians have used prescription drugs for non-prescription reasons, 30 percentage points higher than the rest of the country.

  • Judge calls on library to save money, halt expansion

    The public library’s board of trustees should hang on to its available money, halt its expansion plans and not go into debt, Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway said during Tuesday’s meeting of the Anderson County Fiscal Court.
    Conway said he hoped the fiscal court would join him in sending a message to the library board in the form of a vote to encourage it to reserve its funds, pending the outcome of a lawsuit sweeping across northern Kentucky.

  • In marriage, love makes the difference

    A couple of years ago, some friends of mine reported this experience on Valentine’s Day.
    The husband forgot to make dinner reservations. The couple tried several nice restaurants but found that they were booked. Then they went to a family restaurant of a national chain. They enjoyed their dinner, had fun talking, laughing about experiences they had and celebrated being together for 23 years.  

  • Wild card tosses weather prediction for loop

    I love this weather. I’ll take 60 degrees on Groundhog Day instead of ice, anytime.
    This isn’t even close to what I predicted for our winter weather. My friend Tina asked me a while back what happened. Well, I found out.

  • Shooting the messenger

    Newspapers are easy to hate.
    Believe me, I did.
    Once upon a time, I viewed the newspaper as an old, cantankerous uncle with foul breath, whispering unwanted horror stories right before I fell asleep.
    But despite what I once thought or what disapproving finger pointers say, that’s not the newspaper’s fault.
    Blame human nature.  
    Every week I meet, interview and write about those who strive to make the community a better place to live and work.
    I like these people, and I enjoy telling their stories.

  • Here’s a better way to raise taxes

    Information I shared in last week’s column about pending trouble for the library included some incorrect information.
    The accurate information, though, is even more troubling, depending on where one stands on taxes and how they are levied.
    Last week I wrote about a lawsuit against the public library in Campbell County, brought by citizens who maintain that it has been illegally setting tax rates.
    It’s a complicated case, which last Friday was taken out of circuit court there and sent into federal court.

  • Giving nature a second chance

    Kentucky wildlife receive a second chance at Nature’s Haven, an Anderson County animal recovery center focused on rehabilitating infant mammals and releasing them back into the wild.
    Wildlife rehabilitator Robin Thompson, who has been managing the non-profit center for about a year, describes Nature’s Haven as a “wildlife hospice,” not a petting zoo or pest control.
    “They generally have one foot in the ground by the time we get to them,” she said.  

  • State OKs proposed health cuts, keeping health director part time

    State health officials have approved nearly $190,000 in payroll and other cuts proposed by the Anderson County Health Board’s finance committee, sources have confirmed.
    The spending cuts are designed to wipe out the department’s $185,000 annual operating deficit, and must still be approved by the full board of health. The board’s next meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 15 at the health department, located on Glensboro Road.