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Today's News

  • 100 years of basketball: Who was Lincoln Institute?

    For more than two decades, black Anderson County residents were bused to Lincoln Institute, about a mile west of Simpsonville in Shelby County.
    At one time, there was a high school known as Lawrenceburg Colored, which was located on Lincoln Street, according to local resident John Cunningham, whose mother, Gertrude, attended school there. Cunningham says the school burned in the late 1930s or early 1940s. After that, high school students were bused to Lincoln.

  • 100 years of basketball: Anderson County's state champion

    No school in Anderson County has never won a state high school basketball championship recognized by the Kentucky High School Athletic Association.
    However, the girls' basketball team at Lawrenceburg Colored High School was a state champion, according to local realtor John Cunningham.
    The team included Cunningham's mother, Gertrude Bean Cunningham. He says that another member of the team was Mary Harris Gill. Cunningham says that all of the team members are now deceased.

  • Child shaker pleads guilty

    A Lawrenceburg man has pleaded guilty to injuring his infant daughter by shaking her violently on two occasions.

  • Higher costs, time threaten new ECC

    A new Early Childhood Center may not be as close as school district officials originally thought.
    Anderson County Board of Education members voted Nov. 30 to move forward in building a new ECC even though bids for the project came in close to $1 million over what was expected.
    Even so, enough circumstances have changed regarding the project in the last week that board members will likely vote on the new building again at their December meeting on Monday night, that is, if they don’t call a special meeting to do so beforehand.

  • Admitted welfare cheat gets probation

    The Beth Drive woman accused of bilking the state out of thousands of dollars in childcare funds was placed on probation and ordered to repay the money Tuesday morning in Anderson Circuit Court.
    Shana Bowman admitted taking $14,400 in funding from the state’s Division of Child Care to cover the cost of having her four children in daycare while she allegedly worked.
    However, Bowman turned in falsified employment records, including forging the name of the owner of a Lawrenceburg pizza restaurant and giving it to state officials as proof of employment.

  • ‘Empty bowls’ give new meaning to dinner

    For the third year, Anderson County students will be using “empty bowls” to feed the hungry.

  • Child abuse suspects back in court

    Two David Drive residents charged with physically abusing two children are scheduled to appear Dec. 21 in Anderson Circuit Court.

  • EDITORIAL: School board could lead way to shop local

    Tourism honks and others charged with bringing money into a community all seem to agree that when a dollar is spent locally, it will change hands seven additional times.
    Maybe. We haven’t done nor can we site specific research that will prove that theory, but it seems widely accepted among those who have, and who are we to argue?
    Heck, even Jason Denny, the county clerk whose term as president of the chamber of commerce just ended, referenced that theory during Saturday’s chamber gala at Eagle Lake while encouraging people to shop locally.

  • COLUMN: Unexpected inspiration

    Sometimes inspiration hits you in a way you least expect it.
    To my surprise, this was exactly the case on Tuesday afternoon.
    There is no need to get into grand detail, but I would like to publicly thank Ms. Georgia Kennerly for her very kind and much appreciated thank you card.
    I agree with you in hoping that someone somewhere will benefit from last week’s column.
    Actually that is my hope every week.

  • COLUMN: Consider your talents when deciding on gifts

    Christmas is creeping up on us and I know many of you have not quite finished your shopping.
    Money and time may be factors and I’m here to give you a few inexpensive ideas for gifts from the heart.
    You’re on your own for finding the time.
    Handmade gifts can range from third-grader art projects to museum quality items, depending on your talent and, just like in gardening, some folks have a black thumb. While I can’t draw or paint, and my woodworking skills resemble a Lincoln Logs meets Superglue disaster, I can cook.