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Today's News

  • Cruise nights on Main St. winding down
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  • School board to hold public hearing on 4 percent revenue hike

    Anderson County Board of Education invites the community to a public hearing tonight, Wednesday, Aug. 29 at 5:30 p.m. regarding a potential 4 percent revenue increase for city and county taxpayers.
    A 4 percent revenue increase raises district tax rates from $5.52 to $5.69 per $100,000 assessed value, a 3 percent tax rate increase from last year.
    The increase would add $17 on tax bills of homeowners with properties assessed at $100,000.
    The board is also considering other options in setting its tax rates — compensating and flat.

  • Bike rally for National Guard is Sunday

    Ladies and gentlemen, start your engines.
    The second annual ‘Ride II Remember’ bike rally and Kentucky Headhunters concert will be roaring into town on Sept. 2 starting at 4 p.m. at the American Legion fairgrounds and Legion Auxiliary Healing Field.
    National Community Outreach Coordinator Freddie Maggard II said supporting the troops and riding motorcycles “match up perfectly.”  

  • September is time to prepare house plants

    Here it is almost the end of August.
    Summer has flown by on super sonic wings. The jiggler on the canner has been singing in the kitchen every weekend and I still have bushels to go before I'm done. The pantry is looking better every day. We've only had one fog this month, so far, so I'm hopeful that it will be an easy winter.

  • Dedicating minutes a day makes for happier marriage

    How can you have a happier marriage? Even the best of relationships probably have room to grow a bit more.
    I recently had an opportunity to speak at a local women’s conference about this subject. The idea wasn’t original to me but it certainly makes sense.
    No matter how committed you are to the relationship, it can get stale if you don’t put some effort into making the relationship happy.

  • The roads less traveled

    Anderson County, I give up.
    Just when I think I know exactly where I’m going and what’s going to happen, you dump me on an impossible, toothpick-thin road with no cell phone service and threatening, moody thunderclouds.
    Last week, Editor Ben Carlson wrote about the city slicker behavior of his pets.
    Well, I’m here to tell you to confess I have something in common with his dachshund.
    I am a city slicker. I am unashamed to admit this, because it’s obviously true.  

  • ECC deal finalized, tax rate debate up next

    Column as I see ’em …
    For those wishing to overturn the school board’s decision to practically give away the old ECC building, forget about it.
    I’ve had numerous calls and conversations with people who were highly agitated that the board sold the building and 7.5 acres of land for $75,100, and held out hope that somehow someone would force them to reconsider.
    Of course nothing could make that happen, and the board closed the deal a couple of weeks ago without so much as a public peep.

  • Trashed Hammond Road house finally torn down

    A demolition crew began razing a home Monday on Hammond Road just two weeks before its owner was to go on trial for refusing to tear it down.
    The owner, Steve Gay, was to stand trial Sept. 12 in Anderson District Court.
    The saga over the crumbling home dates back more than year. Gay was originally given 10 days to tear down the home when it was declared unsafe by the county fire chief.
    It wasn’t.
    Gay was then cited and ordered to appear in District Court, where a judge gave him until July 5 to tear it down.

  • Local quartet wins state fair gospel competition

    You can forgive Ben Gee for not letting the speaker finish his sentence last Thursday.

    “All I heard was, ‘The winner, from And …,’ and I lost it,” said Gee, an Anderson County resident who sings bass for New Vision Gospel quartet, the newly crowned winners of the annual rural gospel quartet contest at the Kentucky State Fair.

  • Business drying up for county’s last water hauler

    Loneliness can seep in when waiting for water.
    Professional water hauler Wayne Phillips said he sometimes thinks about his late father and former water hauler William “Mush” Phillips while he waits for his 1,500 water tank to fill a customer’s cistern.
    It usually takes about 10 minutes, but 10 minutes can feel like a long time, Wayne said.
    To pass the time, he’ll listen to country music in the cab of his large, red truck. Read a book. In the past, he flipped through The Anderson News.