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Today's News

  • Pre-integration memories linger for black Anderson County student

    My story is about where I went to high school. To visit this, we have to go back to 1951, my first year in high school.
    It was September 1951 when the black high school students who lived in the city limits of Lawrenceburg were put on a school bus and transported to Lincoln Institute High School, located in Lincoln Ridge, about two miles from Simpsonville.
    Lincoln opened its doors in 1912; we have just finished 100 years. All black people who got out of high school before 1962 finished at Lincoln Institute, and the Lock Road kids went to Simmons in Versailles.

  • Where sidewalk ends, city’s responsibility begins

    Look closely at where the sidewalk ends.
    If you’re like me, you usually don’t think about the short drop where the concrete curb’s lip meets the street.
    For Anderson County residents like Lovada Melser, sometimes you’re forced to think of nothing else.
    Melser, who lives in one of the Breckenridge Estates apartments off of US 62, describes herself as an independent woman.
    It bothers her to have to ask people for help, she said.

  • Meet Lawrenceburg’s Hatfields and McCoys

    Have you seen latest television series about the Hatfields and McCoys?
    If not, don’t bother searching it out in reruns because a battle here between city and county government is remarkably entertaining — even without all the bloodshed.
    For our purposes, we’ll make the fiscal court the County Hatfields and the city council the City McCoys. (You’ll find out why shortly.)
    Like the famous families, the County Hatfields and City McCoys have been locked in battle for years, and no one is absolutely certain exactly what caused the ruckus.

  • The week in sports photos

    Scenes from the week in sports in Anderson County.

  • 140th fair, horse show begins Saturday

    From staff reports
    The 140th annual Lawrenceburg Fair and Horse Show will begin its week of horse shows, pageants and carnival rides this Saturday, June 23 with the gates opening at noon at the fairgrounds.
    The Fair and Horse Show, set to run June 23 through June 30, features a variety of entertainment, competition and attractions, including a few new events.
    The Fair and Horse Show has one of the largest outdoor saddle horse shows in the world, offering saddlebreds, miniature horses, hackneys and roadsters.

  • Recycling to get easier this fall

    By Ben Carlson
    News staff
    Recycling efforts in Anderson County will take a mighty leap forward this fall, thanks to a state grant and the efforts of the Anderson County Environmental Committee.
    The state announced last week that the county will receive a $125,291 grant, enough to fuel plans the committee has worked on since it was formed last April by the Anderson County Fiscal Court.

  • City council kicks judges, others out of reserved parking spots

    County officials — including Anderson County’s district and circuit court judges — might find themselves circling Main Street in the weeks to come to find a parking spot close to the courthouse.   
    County Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway recently received a letter from the city council to remove the county’s reserved parking signs on Ollie Bowen Street.
    The same reserved parking signs, city council member Ken Evans said, that were never authorized by the city to be placed.

  • Steeplechase

    If worshippers feel small when they walk into Goshen Baptist Church, that’s just fine with Pastor Fred Knickerbocker.
    They are supposed to, thanks to a new steeple that was erected atop the church last Friday morning.
    Knickerbocker said the steeple, which is graced at the top with a gold cross, makes people feel small by design, but not in a negative way.
    “The closer [the steeple] gets to Heaven, the smaller it gets,” said Knickerbocker, who has said grace since 1977 over what is believed to be Anderson County’s oldest church.

  • Report questions psych drug use at Heritage Hall

    A watchdog group claims that a local nursing home is administering antipsychotic drugs to residents without a psychosis or related condition in an effort to keep staffing costs down.
    Kentuckians for Nursing Home Reform cites a nationwide study by the federal government that reveals nearly 1-in-5 residents at Heritage Hall without psychosis or related condition received antipsychotic drugs.
    The study was conducted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and released by last month by The Boston Globe.

  • Alves goes west to begin chase of coaching dream

    Jordan Alves has taken Horace Greeley's advice to a new level.

    The young man has gone west. Like 2,360 miles, give or take a few singles, west for his first job as a head baseball coach.

    The Anderson County High School graduate is coaching with the Portland  Baseball Club organization. As in Portland, Oregon, the town Alves was probably more familiar with as the hometown of former Kentucky basketball player Terrence Jones than a place that would give him his first chance at running the show on the diamond.