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Today's News

  • Education Briefs June 17, 2015

    Students earn degrees
    The University of the Cumberlands conferred five advanced degrees in dducation to five local students last month, according to a news release from the university.
     Tracy Hall received a Masters of Arts in Education (MAE) degree in Read Write Specialist P to 12. Leslie Hulsey received a MAE in Teacher as Leader.
    Rebecca Moreland, Heather Snodgrass and Logan Young all received MAE’s in School Guidance Counselor.

    Hollander completes research project in London

  • Students give summer food program an A-plus

    means no school, no early mornings and no homework. But for others it may also mean no meals.
    According to the Kentucky Association of Food Banks, one in five children struggle with hunger in Kentucky. The School Breakfast and National School Lunch Programs usually help to alleviate the problem of food availability to children who do not have access to adequate nutrition, but during summer months a child’s access to healthy meals drops dramatically.

  • Area veterinarian takes her show on the road

    When Gail Perry’s mixed-breed dog awoke from recent dental surgery, it wasn’t inside a kennel, confused and wondering where it was.
    Instead, the 12-year-old dog that had been suffering from dental issues and an infection awoke in Perry’s living room on Versailles Road, safely snuggled into a soft blanket.
    Perry’s other three dogs did the same, thanks to a mobile veterinarian operation located in Waddy.

  • Programs exist to help you find affordable housing

    Housing is usually the biggest expense for a family, whether you are a family of one or 10 people. Help is available with housing costs for families who qualify.
    There are more programs available than the ones mentioned below. Please read this even if it doesn’t fit your situation. You may be able to help someone else in the future by telling them about HUD housing rentals and sales and the Good Neighbor Next Door program.

  • Tobacco growers should watch for blue mold

    On June 2, active blue mold was found in a greenhouse in Greenville, Tennesee and in field plants that were set from the same greenhouse.

  • Now is the time to fertilize your garden

    It’s the popping season. Blooms are popping open and turning into fruit. Visually it is a wonder to watch. Whether it’s a flower, fruit or veggie, it’s fun to watch the changes as the growing takes place.
    Tomatoes are especially cool because we get such a big red fruit from such a tiny yellow flower. Watermelons and cucumbers also follow that same fast forward path. Beans and peppers start with a little white blossom. No matter the color, the result is the same, food from flowers.

  • Dad’s lessons still resonate

    “Hello, may I speak with Mr. Barker?”
    I sigh and start my well-rehearsed speech, explaining to the caller they have reached Ricki Barker the younger and that I am the female Ricki in my family.
    My father and I share many things: a love of animals, good books, lemon meringue pie and a name.
    The latter similarity has led to many humorous moments throughout the years.

  • Outpouring for Kenny was well deserved

    Column as I see ’em …
    First, a little housekeeping.
    I pointed out in last week’s column how, in its new budget, the fiscal court cut about $9,000 from Senior Center funding.
    That’s true but should have included additional context in that the amount the center was given was the amount it asked for, according to Judge-Executive Orbrey Gritton.
    It marks the first time I’ve ever heard of a senior center or similar agency asking to have its funding reduced.
    Ever.

  • Outpouring for Kenny was well deserved

    By Ben Carlson, Publisher

    Column as I see ’em …
    First, a little housekeeping.
    I pointed out in last week’s column how, in its new budget, the fiscal court cut about $9,000 from Senior Center funding.
    That’s true but should have included additional context in that the amount the center was given was the amount it asked for, according to Judge-Executive Orbrey Gritton.
    It marks the first time I’ve ever heard of a senior center or similar agency asking to have its funding reduced.
    Ever.

  • Bank announces plans to celebrate anniversary

    Century Bank will host a cookout for the community on Friday, July 10 from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. outside of its main office on Glensboro Road.
    The cookout is one of several events planned to celebrate the bank’s 15th anniversary, according to a news release.
    Century Bank opened its doors in July 2000.
    Also planned is a Kid’s Day from 1 to 4 p.m. on July 8, featuring inflatables, face painting, balloon animals, giveaways and free snow cones.
    On July 9, the bank will give away two shopping sprees from 2 to 6 p.m. at its branch in Kroger.